Contribution of geomorphological assessment for sustainable geotourism: A case of Iran's Desert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deserts have enormous unique natural and human attractions, although there are many superficial rough nesses. Generally, when managed and operated properly, desert attractions provide ample benefits including a highly profitable industry of tourism. The prosperity of Geotourism in desert areas also helps to broaden the economic spectrum of the country which is normally unproductive agricultural and industrial activities, but also revives to improvement quality of life of local communities. This article focuses on geomorphological characteristics of desert areas of Kavirs which cover about 25 percent of Iran's area. These regions have a collection of all the geomorphological phenomena related to deserts. Here, geological relics have been found including landforms, water landscapes, paleontological remains and rock formation. Iran's two great deserts, Lut Kavir and Great Kavir, are vast and, relatively unexplored regions in the eastern part of central Iran. The deserts include three of the world's phenomena. First, Ghourd: the world's highest sand pyramids which are huge sand dunes 2000m long and 500m high. Second, Yardang or Kalut: an area of 150 km long, 70 km wide and 80m high, which comprises long deep moats (ditches) created by storms and floods. Third, being the hottest point in the world as recorded by the satellite images. Iran deserts also contain a variety of sand deposits such as seif, barkhan, yardang, sand pyramids (Ghourd), sand channels and nebka. Vast clay and saline lands as well as salt polygons are other ubiquitous features of its deserts. This article also identifies the geomorphological features that lead to Geotourism development and demand for Iran's unique desert tourism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1188-1195
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Environmental Biology
Volume6
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Iran
deserts
desert
sand
tourism
Industry
Salts
Economics
Quality of Life
geomorphological feature
Water
landforms
polygon
quality of life
dunes
developed countries
landform
dune
rocks
clay

Keywords

  • Desert
  • Geomorphology
  • Geotourism
  • Iran
  • Sustainability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Contribution of geomorphological assessment for sustainable geotourism : A case of Iran's Desert. / Eshraghi, Mahdi; Ahmad, Habibah; Toriman, Mohd. Ekhwan.

In: Advances in Environmental Biology, Vol. 6, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 1188-1195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{165dd93f7d9b4c68a23cd2529d6353b8,
title = "Contribution of geomorphological assessment for sustainable geotourism: A case of Iran's Desert",
abstract = "Deserts have enormous unique natural and human attractions, although there are many superficial rough nesses. Generally, when managed and operated properly, desert attractions provide ample benefits including a highly profitable industry of tourism. The prosperity of Geotourism in desert areas also helps to broaden the economic spectrum of the country which is normally unproductive agricultural and industrial activities, but also revives to improvement quality of life of local communities. This article focuses on geomorphological characteristics of desert areas of Kavirs which cover about 25 percent of Iran's area. These regions have a collection of all the geomorphological phenomena related to deserts. Here, geological relics have been found including landforms, water landscapes, paleontological remains and rock formation. Iran's two great deserts, Lut Kavir and Great Kavir, are vast and, relatively unexplored regions in the eastern part of central Iran. The deserts include three of the world's phenomena. First, Ghourd: the world's highest sand pyramids which are huge sand dunes 2000m long and 500m high. Second, Yardang or Kalut: an area of 150 km long, 70 km wide and 80m high, which comprises long deep moats (ditches) created by storms and floods. Third, being the hottest point in the world as recorded by the satellite images. Iran deserts also contain a variety of sand deposits such as seif, barkhan, yardang, sand pyramids (Ghourd), sand channels and nebka. Vast clay and saline lands as well as salt polygons are other ubiquitous features of its deserts. This article also identifies the geomorphological features that lead to Geotourism development and demand for Iran's unique desert tourism.",
keywords = "Desert, Geomorphology, Geotourism, Iran, Sustainability",
author = "Mahdi Eshraghi and Habibah Ahmad and Toriman, {Mohd. Ekhwan}",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "1188--1195",
journal = "Advances in Environmental Biology",
issn = "1995-0756",
publisher = "American-Eurasian Network for Scientific Information",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contribution of geomorphological assessment for sustainable geotourism

T2 - A case of Iran's Desert

AU - Eshraghi, Mahdi

AU - Ahmad, Habibah

AU - Toriman, Mohd. Ekhwan

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - Deserts have enormous unique natural and human attractions, although there are many superficial rough nesses. Generally, when managed and operated properly, desert attractions provide ample benefits including a highly profitable industry of tourism. The prosperity of Geotourism in desert areas also helps to broaden the economic spectrum of the country which is normally unproductive agricultural and industrial activities, but also revives to improvement quality of life of local communities. This article focuses on geomorphological characteristics of desert areas of Kavirs which cover about 25 percent of Iran's area. These regions have a collection of all the geomorphological phenomena related to deserts. Here, geological relics have been found including landforms, water landscapes, paleontological remains and rock formation. Iran's two great deserts, Lut Kavir and Great Kavir, are vast and, relatively unexplored regions in the eastern part of central Iran. The deserts include three of the world's phenomena. First, Ghourd: the world's highest sand pyramids which are huge sand dunes 2000m long and 500m high. Second, Yardang or Kalut: an area of 150 km long, 70 km wide and 80m high, which comprises long deep moats (ditches) created by storms and floods. Third, being the hottest point in the world as recorded by the satellite images. Iran deserts also contain a variety of sand deposits such as seif, barkhan, yardang, sand pyramids (Ghourd), sand channels and nebka. Vast clay and saline lands as well as salt polygons are other ubiquitous features of its deserts. This article also identifies the geomorphological features that lead to Geotourism development and demand for Iran's unique desert tourism.

AB - Deserts have enormous unique natural and human attractions, although there are many superficial rough nesses. Generally, when managed and operated properly, desert attractions provide ample benefits including a highly profitable industry of tourism. The prosperity of Geotourism in desert areas also helps to broaden the economic spectrum of the country which is normally unproductive agricultural and industrial activities, but also revives to improvement quality of life of local communities. This article focuses on geomorphological characteristics of desert areas of Kavirs which cover about 25 percent of Iran's area. These regions have a collection of all the geomorphological phenomena related to deserts. Here, geological relics have been found including landforms, water landscapes, paleontological remains and rock formation. Iran's two great deserts, Lut Kavir and Great Kavir, are vast and, relatively unexplored regions in the eastern part of central Iran. The deserts include three of the world's phenomena. First, Ghourd: the world's highest sand pyramids which are huge sand dunes 2000m long and 500m high. Second, Yardang or Kalut: an area of 150 km long, 70 km wide and 80m high, which comprises long deep moats (ditches) created by storms and floods. Third, being the hottest point in the world as recorded by the satellite images. Iran deserts also contain a variety of sand deposits such as seif, barkhan, yardang, sand pyramids (Ghourd), sand channels and nebka. Vast clay and saline lands as well as salt polygons are other ubiquitous features of its deserts. This article also identifies the geomorphological features that lead to Geotourism development and demand for Iran's unique desert tourism.

KW - Desert

KW - Geomorphology

KW - Geotourism

KW - Iran

KW - Sustainability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860701811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860701811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84860701811

VL - 6

SP - 1188

EP - 1195

JO - Advances in Environmental Biology

JF - Advances in Environmental Biology

SN - 1995-0756

IS - 3

ER -