Content coverage in problem-based learning.

S. H. Shahabudin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Required learning of the basic medical sciences based on five clinical problems was compiled by teachers and subsequently derived as 'learning needs' by students during the problem-solving process. These lists of topics were compared in terms of number of lecture-hours and when these were taught in the traditional curriculum. The findings indicate that learning from problems is not entirely free-rein and can be largely determined by teachers; topics taught earlier in the course appeared more frequently than latter topics and there was a tremendous overlap of topics in both the traditional and problem-based list. Regardless of whether lectures have been given or not, students recalled facts better if they had encountered the related clinical problem. This study also reveals that problem-based learning can be as efficient as lectures in content coverage and concludes that the lecture method be retained provided the topics are selective and are derived and sequenced appropriately with clinical problems. Problem-solving should be adopted as a teaching strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)310-313
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Education
Volume21
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Problem-Based Learning
coverage
Learning
Students
learning
Curriculum
Teaching
teacher
teaching strategy
student
curriculum
science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Shahabudin, S. H. (1987). Content coverage in problem-based learning. Medical Education, 21(4), 310-313.

Content coverage in problem-based learning. / Shahabudin, S. H.

In: Medical Education, Vol. 21, No. 4, 07.1987, p. 310-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shahabudin, SH 1987, 'Content coverage in problem-based learning.', Medical Education, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 310-313.
Shahabudin SH. Content coverage in problem-based learning. Medical Education. 1987 Jul;21(4):310-313.
Shahabudin, S. H. / Content coverage in problem-based learning. In: Medical Education. 1987 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 310-313.
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