Confocal microscopic observations of the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear

Nathan Efron, Haliza Abdul Mutalib, Inma Perez-Gomez, Hui Hiang Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Striae and folds are observed with a slitlamp biomicroscope in the cornea following overnight contact lens wear. These phenomena are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to employ confocal microscopy to observe and document these and other morphological changes in the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear. Methods: Slitlamp biomicroscopy, slit-scanning confocal microscopy and ultrasonic pachometry were performed on both eyes of 13 subjects (3M, 10F, age 24 ± 3 years) before and after eight hours overnight wear of a -3.00 D Bausch & Lomb one day disposable soft contact lens (Dk/t = 15.1 × 10 -9 {cm/sec} × {ml O 2/ml × mmHg}) in one eye; the other non-lens-wearing eye acted as a control. Results: Following sleep, both corneas were swollen (lens-wearing eye 11.8 ± 3.8 per cent; control eye 2.1 ± 1.9 per cent) and the stroma of both corneas displayed an apparent reduction in keratocyte density (lens-wearing eye 21 per cent; control eye 10 per cent). Folds were observed with the slitlamp biomicroscope and long, straight, dark, orthogonal lines were observed with the confocal microscope, in the posterior stroma of the oedematous lens-wearing eyes. Such features were not observed in the control eyes. The keratocytes appeared less distinct with greater levels of corneal oedema. Conclusion: The apparent loss of keratocytes following overnight lens wear is an optical artefact that can be explained in terms of corneal oedema causing volumetric tissue expansion and a loss of optical clarity, which hampers keratocyte detection. These findings place the onus on researchers postulating a loss of stromal keratocytes following clinical interventions, such as contact lens wear, to account for the effects of oedema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Optometry
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contact Lenses
Cornea
Crystalline Lens
Corneal Edema
Confocal Microscopy
Tissue Expansion
Hydrophilic Contact Lens
Ultrasonics
Artifacts
Lenses
Edema
Sleep
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Closed eye
  • Confocal microscopy
  • Contact lens
  • Cornea
  • Keratocytes
  • Oedema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Optometry

Cite this

Confocal microscopic observations of the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear. / Efron, Nathan; Abdul Mutalib, Haliza; Perez-Gomez, Inma; Koh, Hui Hiang.

In: Clinical and Experimental Optometry, Vol. 85, No. 3, 05.2002, p. 149-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{aca48ec59f034c8f842b8491ecd6120e,
title = "Confocal microscopic observations of the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear",
abstract = "Striae and folds are observed with a slitlamp biomicroscope in the cornea following overnight contact lens wear. These phenomena are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to employ confocal microscopy to observe and document these and other morphological changes in the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear. Methods: Slitlamp biomicroscopy, slit-scanning confocal microscopy and ultrasonic pachometry were performed on both eyes of 13 subjects (3M, 10F, age 24 ± 3 years) before and after eight hours overnight wear of a -3.00 D Bausch & Lomb one day disposable soft contact lens (Dk/t = 15.1 × 10 -9 {cm/sec} × {ml O 2/ml × mmHg}) in one eye; the other non-lens-wearing eye acted as a control. Results: Following sleep, both corneas were swollen (lens-wearing eye 11.8 ± 3.8 per cent; control eye 2.1 ± 1.9 per cent) and the stroma of both corneas displayed an apparent reduction in keratocyte density (lens-wearing eye 21 per cent; control eye 10 per cent). Folds were observed with the slitlamp biomicroscope and long, straight, dark, orthogonal lines were observed with the confocal microscope, in the posterior stroma of the oedematous lens-wearing eyes. Such features were not observed in the control eyes. The keratocytes appeared less distinct with greater levels of corneal oedema. Conclusion: The apparent loss of keratocytes following overnight lens wear is an optical artefact that can be explained in terms of corneal oedema causing volumetric tissue expansion and a loss of optical clarity, which hampers keratocyte detection. These findings place the onus on researchers postulating a loss of stromal keratocytes following clinical interventions, such as contact lens wear, to account for the effects of oedema.",
keywords = "Closed eye, Confocal microscopy, Contact lens, Cornea, Keratocytes, Oedema",
author = "Nathan Efron and {Abdul Mutalib}, Haliza and Inma Perez-Gomez and Koh, {Hui Hiang}",
year = "2002",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1111/j.1444-0938.2002.tb03027.x",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "149--155",
journal = "The Australasian journal of optometry",
issn = "0817-881X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Confocal microscopic observations of the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear

AU - Efron, Nathan

AU - Abdul Mutalib, Haliza

AU - Perez-Gomez, Inma

AU - Koh, Hui Hiang

PY - 2002/5

Y1 - 2002/5

N2 - Striae and folds are observed with a slitlamp biomicroscope in the cornea following overnight contact lens wear. These phenomena are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to employ confocal microscopy to observe and document these and other morphological changes in the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear. Methods: Slitlamp biomicroscopy, slit-scanning confocal microscopy and ultrasonic pachometry were performed on both eyes of 13 subjects (3M, 10F, age 24 ± 3 years) before and after eight hours overnight wear of a -3.00 D Bausch & Lomb one day disposable soft contact lens (Dk/t = 15.1 × 10 -9 {cm/sec} × {ml O 2/ml × mmHg}) in one eye; the other non-lens-wearing eye acted as a control. Results: Following sleep, both corneas were swollen (lens-wearing eye 11.8 ± 3.8 per cent; control eye 2.1 ± 1.9 per cent) and the stroma of both corneas displayed an apparent reduction in keratocyte density (lens-wearing eye 21 per cent; control eye 10 per cent). Folds were observed with the slitlamp biomicroscope and long, straight, dark, orthogonal lines were observed with the confocal microscope, in the posterior stroma of the oedematous lens-wearing eyes. Such features were not observed in the control eyes. The keratocytes appeared less distinct with greater levels of corneal oedema. Conclusion: The apparent loss of keratocytes following overnight lens wear is an optical artefact that can be explained in terms of corneal oedema causing volumetric tissue expansion and a loss of optical clarity, which hampers keratocyte detection. These findings place the onus on researchers postulating a loss of stromal keratocytes following clinical interventions, such as contact lens wear, to account for the effects of oedema.

AB - Striae and folds are observed with a slitlamp biomicroscope in the cornea following overnight contact lens wear. These phenomena are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to employ confocal microscopy to observe and document these and other morphological changes in the human cornea following overnight contact lens wear. Methods: Slitlamp biomicroscopy, slit-scanning confocal microscopy and ultrasonic pachometry were performed on both eyes of 13 subjects (3M, 10F, age 24 ± 3 years) before and after eight hours overnight wear of a -3.00 D Bausch & Lomb one day disposable soft contact lens (Dk/t = 15.1 × 10 -9 {cm/sec} × {ml O 2/ml × mmHg}) in one eye; the other non-lens-wearing eye acted as a control. Results: Following sleep, both corneas were swollen (lens-wearing eye 11.8 ± 3.8 per cent; control eye 2.1 ± 1.9 per cent) and the stroma of both corneas displayed an apparent reduction in keratocyte density (lens-wearing eye 21 per cent; control eye 10 per cent). Folds were observed with the slitlamp biomicroscope and long, straight, dark, orthogonal lines were observed with the confocal microscope, in the posterior stroma of the oedematous lens-wearing eyes. Such features were not observed in the control eyes. The keratocytes appeared less distinct with greater levels of corneal oedema. Conclusion: The apparent loss of keratocytes following overnight lens wear is an optical artefact that can be explained in terms of corneal oedema causing volumetric tissue expansion and a loss of optical clarity, which hampers keratocyte detection. These findings place the onus on researchers postulating a loss of stromal keratocytes following clinical interventions, such as contact lens wear, to account for the effects of oedema.

KW - Closed eye

KW - Confocal microscopy

KW - Contact lens

KW - Cornea

KW - Keratocytes

KW - Oedema

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036562697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036562697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1444-0938.2002.tb03027.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1444-0938.2002.tb03027.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 12033975

AN - SCOPUS:0036562697

VL - 85

SP - 149

EP - 155

JO - The Australasian journal of optometry

JF - The Australasian journal of optometry

SN - 0817-881X

IS - 3

ER -