Concentration of particulate matter, CO and CO2 in selected schools inMalaysia

Nikmatun Yusro Yang Razali, Mohd Talib Latif, Doreena Dominick, Noorlin Mohamad, Fazrul Razman Sulaiman, Thunwadee Srithawirat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Good Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is important to ensure improved performance and productivity of students and teachers. Research was conducted at three selected schools in semiurban areas of Bandar Baru Bangi and Putrajaya, Malaysia to investigate the influence of the local surroundings on the IAQ in the school classrooms. The concentrations of gas pollutants (CO, CO2) and particulate matter (PM) (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) have been determined using automatic portable indoor air spectrometers. The results show that the overall average concentrations of the main parameters recorded inside the schools were 31μgm-3 (PM10), 18μgm-3 (PM2.5), 16μgm-3 (PM1), 502ppm (CO2) and 0.3ppm (CO). These concentrations were still below the recommended values suggested by the Malaysian Department of Safety and Health (DOSH), the Singapore National Environmental Agency (NEA) and the Hong Kong IAQ Guidelines for Offices and Public Places. In most cases, there were significant correlations (p<0.01) between air pollutants and meteorological factors such as temperature and relative humidity in the classrooms. The results of Indoor/Outdoor (I/O) ratios demonstrated that the concentration of indoor air pollutants in different classrooms was not necessarily influenced by outdoor air pollutants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-116
Number of pages9
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume87
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

Fingerprint

indoor air
particulate matter
air
Air quality
pollutant
Air
air quality
school
classroom
Spectrometers
Atmospheric humidity
health and safety
Productivity
Health
Students
relative humidity
spectrometer
student
Singapore
Malaysia

Keywords

  • CO
  • CO
  • I/O ratio
  • Indoor air quality
  • Particulate matter
  • School classroom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Concentration of particulate matter, CO and CO2 in selected schools inMalaysia. / Yang Razali, Nikmatun Yusro; Latif, Mohd Talib; Dominick, Doreena; Mohamad, Noorlin; Sulaiman, Fazrul Razman; Srithawirat, Thunwadee.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 87, 01.05.2015, p. 108-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang Razali, NY, Latif, MT, Dominick, D, Mohamad, N, Sulaiman, FR & Srithawirat, T 2015, 'Concentration of particulate matter, CO and CO2 in selected schools inMalaysia', Building and Environment, vol. 87, pp. 108-116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2015.01.015
Yang Razali, Nikmatun Yusro ; Latif, Mohd Talib ; Dominick, Doreena ; Mohamad, Noorlin ; Sulaiman, Fazrul Razman ; Srithawirat, Thunwadee. / Concentration of particulate matter, CO and CO2 in selected schools inMalaysia. In: Building and Environment. 2015 ; Vol. 87. pp. 108-116.
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