Comprehensive assessment of PM2.5 physicochemical properties during the Southeast Asia dry season (southwest monsoon)

Firoz Khan, Nor Azura Sulong, Mohd Talib Latif, Mohd Shahrul Mohd Nadzir, Norhaniza Amil, Dini Fajrina Mohd Hussain, Vernon Lee, Puteri Nurafidah Hosaini, Suhana Shaharom, Nur Amira Yasmin Mohd Yusoff, Hossain Mohammed Syedul Hoque, Jing Xiang Chung, Mazrura Sahani, Norhayati Mohd Tahir, Ju Neng Liew, Khairul Nizam Abdul Maulud, Sharifah Mastura Syed Abdullah, Yusuke Fujii, Susumu Tohno, Akira Mizohata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A comprehensive assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) compositions during the Southeast Asia dry season is presented. Samples of PM2.5 were collected between 24 June and 14 September 2014 using a high-volume sampler. Water-soluble ions, trace species, rare earth elements, and a range of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon were analyzed. The characterization and source apportionment of PM2.5 were investigated. The results showed that the 24 h PM2.5 concentration ranged from 6.64 to 68.2 µg m−3. Meteorological driving factors strongly governed the diurnal concentration of aerosol, while the traffic in the morning and evening rush hours coincided with higher levels of CO and NO2. The correlation analysis for non sea-salt K+-EC showed that EC is potentially associated with biomass burning events, while the formation of secondary organic carbon had a moderate association with motor vehicle emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) version 5.0 identified the sources of PM2.5: (i) biomass burning coupled with sea salt [I] (7%), (ii) aged sea salt and mixed industrial emissions (5%), (iii) road dust and fuel oil combustion (7%), (iv) coal-fired combustion (25%), (v) mineral dust (8%), (vi) secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) coupled with F (15%), and (vii) motor vehicle emissions coupled with sea salt [II] (24%). Motor vehicle emissions, SIA, and coal-fired power plant are the predominant sources contributing to PM2.5. The response of the potential source contribution function and Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory backward trajectory model suggest that the outline of source regions were consistent to the sources by PMF 5.0.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14,589-14,611
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume121
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Dec 2016

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Southeast Asia
monsoons
sea salt
physicochemical property
South East Asia
Vehicle Emissions
dry season
physicochemical properties
monsoon
Salts
Aerosols
motor vehicles
aerosols
Carbon
Coal
carbon
salts
aerosol
biomass burning
Organic carbon

Keywords

  • biomass burning
  • chemical compositions
  • local emission sources
  • positive matrix factorization
  • Southeast Asia dry monsoon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

Comprehensive assessment of PM2.5 physicochemical properties during the Southeast Asia dry season (southwest monsoon). / Khan, Firoz; Sulong, Nor Azura; Latif, Mohd Talib; Mohd Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul; Amil, Norhaniza; Hussain, Dini Fajrina Mohd; Lee, Vernon; Hosaini, Puteri Nurafidah; Shaharom, Suhana; Yusoff, Nur Amira Yasmin Mohd; Hoque, Hossain Mohammed Syedul; Chung, Jing Xiang; Sahani, Mazrura; Mohd Tahir, Norhayati; Liew, Ju Neng; Abdul Maulud, Khairul Nizam; Syed Abdullah, Sharifah Mastura; Fujii, Yusuke; Tohno, Susumu; Mizohata, Akira.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 121, No. 24, 27.12.2016, p. 14,589-14,611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, F, Sulong, NA, Latif, MT, Mohd Nadzir, MS, Amil, N, Hussain, DFM, Lee, V, Hosaini, PN, Shaharom, S, Yusoff, NAYM, Hoque, HMS, Chung, JX, Sahani, M, Mohd Tahir, N, Liew, JN, Abdul Maulud, KN, Syed Abdullah, SM, Fujii, Y, Tohno, S & Mizohata, A 2016, 'Comprehensive assessment of PM2.5 physicochemical properties during the Southeast Asia dry season (southwest monsoon)', Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 121, no. 24, pp. 14,589-14,611. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JD025894
Khan, Firoz ; Sulong, Nor Azura ; Latif, Mohd Talib ; Mohd Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul ; Amil, Norhaniza ; Hussain, Dini Fajrina Mohd ; Lee, Vernon ; Hosaini, Puteri Nurafidah ; Shaharom, Suhana ; Yusoff, Nur Amira Yasmin Mohd ; Hoque, Hossain Mohammed Syedul ; Chung, Jing Xiang ; Sahani, Mazrura ; Mohd Tahir, Norhayati ; Liew, Ju Neng ; Abdul Maulud, Khairul Nizam ; Syed Abdullah, Sharifah Mastura ; Fujii, Yusuke ; Tohno, Susumu ; Mizohata, Akira. / Comprehensive assessment of PM2.5 physicochemical properties during the Southeast Asia dry season (southwest monsoon). In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. 2016 ; Vol. 121, No. 24. pp. 14,589-14,611.
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AU - Latif, Mohd Talib

AU - Mohd Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul

AU - Amil, Norhaniza

AU - Hussain, Dini Fajrina Mohd

AU - Lee, Vernon

AU - Hosaini, Puteri Nurafidah

AU - Shaharom, Suhana

AU - Yusoff, Nur Amira Yasmin Mohd

AU - Hoque, Hossain Mohammed Syedul

AU - Chung, Jing Xiang

AU - Sahani, Mazrura

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AU - Abdul Maulud, Khairul Nizam

AU - Syed Abdullah, Sharifah Mastura

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