Composition of levoglucosan and surfactants in atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning

Mohd Talib Latif, Norhidayah Yusof Anuwar, Thunwadee Srithawirat, Intan Suraya Razak, Nor Azam Ramli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomass burning contributes to various organic substances in the atmosphere. Levoglucosan has been recognised as one of the indicators of biomass burning and surfactants are a group of molecules which can be distributed through biomass burning. This research aims to determine the composition of levoglucosan and surfactants in agricultural areas and the several tropical plant species which can contribute to a high amount of levoglucosan and surfactants in the atmosphere. Suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere (fine and coarse mode) was collected in the agricultural areas (paddy fields) during the dry season and compared to samples collected at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi. The soot samples were prepared through the burning of several tropical plant species, namely: Oryza sativa, Rhizophora spp., Elaeis guineensis and Saccharum officinarum at 300°C in a furnace. This allowed for the levels of levoglucosan and surfactants such as MBAS and DBAS to be determined using the colorimetric method. Oxidation and UV radiation were also used to examine the impact of photo-oxidation on the concentration of levoglucosan and surfactants in soot. The results showed that the concentration of levoglucosan in the agricultural areas during harvesting season is significantly higher compared to the levoglucosan recorded at UKM Bangi (semi-urban areas). The concentration of surfactants is dominated by anionic surfactants, particularly in fine mode aerosols. Soot from leaves was found to contribute a high amount of levoglucosan when compared to wood and straw. There are indications that biomass burning can contribute to a large quantity of polar group molecules which behave like anionic surfactants and correlate to the amount of surfactants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-845
Number of pages9
JournalAerosol and Air Quality Research
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Atmospheric aerosols
biomass burning
Surface-Active Agents
surfactant
Biomass
Surface active agents
aerosol
Chemical analysis
Soot
soot
Anionic surfactants
agricultural land
atmosphere
Molecules
Photooxidation
Straw
Particulate Matter
1,6-anhydro-beta-glucopyranose
Ultraviolet radiation
Aerosols

Keywords

  • Biomass burning
  • Levoglucosan
  • Surfactants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

Cite this

Composition of levoglucosan and surfactants in atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning. / Latif, Mohd Talib; Anuwar, Norhidayah Yusof; Srithawirat, Thunwadee; Razak, Intan Suraya; Ramli, Nor Azam.

In: Aerosol and Air Quality Research, Vol. 11, No. 7, 12.2011, p. 837-845.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Latif, Mohd Talib ; Anuwar, Norhidayah Yusof ; Srithawirat, Thunwadee ; Razak, Intan Suraya ; Ramli, Nor Azam. / Composition of levoglucosan and surfactants in atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning. In: Aerosol and Air Quality Research. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 7. pp. 837-845.
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