Composition and possible sources of anionic surfactants from urban and semi-urban street dust

Nurul Bahiyah Abd Wahid, Mohd Talib Latif, Suhaimi Suratman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was carried out to determine the distribution of anionic surfactants in street dust samples from urban and semi-urban areas of Malaysia. The dust was collected from streets experiencing heavy traffic in both Kuala Lumpur, an urban location, and Bangi, a semi-urban location. The samples were separated into three particle size fractions (μm) using a laboratory test sieve, namely: fraction A (125 > X ≥ 63), fraction B (63 > X ≥ 45) and fraction C (X < 45). Anionic surfactants as Methylene Blue Active Substance (MBAS) were determined by the Colorimetric Method using a UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. Results indicated that anionic surfactants (MBAS) from fraction C showed the highest concentration (Kuala Lumpur 0.53 ± 0.04 μmolg−1 and Bangi 0.49 ± 0.03 μmolg−1), followed by larger particles (fractions B and A). The cations detected followed the trend of Ca2+ > K+ > Na+ > NH4 > Mg2+, whereas for anions, the trend was SO4 2− > Cl > NO3 > F, respectively. Results from principal component analysis and the multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) of ionic compositions, clearly revealed that surfactants from the street dust at both sampling stations were primarily derived from anthropogenic sources. Examples of these sources include construction/industrial activity and vehicular emissions/biomass burning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalAir Quality, Atmosphere and Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Anionic surfactants
Dust
Surface-Active Agents
surfactant
dust
Chemical analysis
Vehicle Emissions
ionic composition
Sieves
Malaysia
anthropogenic source
biomass burning
Principal Component Analysis
Particle Size
Linear regression
Biomass
Principal component analysis
Anions
anion
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Ionic compositions
  • MBAS
  • Source identification
  • Street dust
  • Surfactants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Composition and possible sources of anionic surfactants from urban and semi-urban street dust. / Wahid, Nurul Bahiyah Abd; Latif, Mohd Talib; Suratman, Suhaimi.

In: Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 05.07.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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