Complete killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Burkholderia pseudomallei is dependent on prolonged direct association with the viable pathogen

Song Hua Lee, Soon Keat Ooi, Nor Muhammad Mahadi, Man Wah Tan, Sheila Nathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease of significant morbidity and mortality in both human and animals in endemic areas. Much remains to be known about the contributions of genotypic variations within the bacteria and the host, and environmental factors that lead to the manifestation of the clinical symptoms of melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we showed that different isolates of B. pseudomallei have divergent ability to kill the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The rate of nematode killing was also dependent on growth media: B. pseudomallei grown on peptone-glucose media killed C. elegans more rapidly than bacteria grown on the nematode growth media. Filter and bacteria cell-free culture filtrate assays demonstrated that the extent of killing observed is significantly less than that observed in the direct killing assay. Additionally, we showed that B. pseudomallei does not persistently accumulate within the C. elegans gut as brief exposure to B. pseudomallei is not sufficient for C. elegans infection. Conclusions/Significance: A combination of genetic and environmental factors affects virulence. In addition, we have also demonstrated that a Burkholderia-specific mechanism mediating the pathogenic effect in C. elegans requires proliferating B. pseudomallei to continuously produce toxins to mediate complete killing.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere16707
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Burkholderia pseudomallei
Caenorhabditis elegans
Pathogens
Bacteria
Association reactions
pathogens
Assays
Melioidosis
Peptones
Virulence Factors
bacteria
Animals
culture media
Nematoda
Burkholderia
Soils
Glucose
environmental factors
soil nematodes
peptones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Complete killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Burkholderia pseudomallei is dependent on prolonged direct association with the viable pathogen. / Lee, Song Hua; Ooi, Soon Keat; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Tan, Man Wah; Nathan, Sheila.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 3, e16707, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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