Comparison between the effects of propofol and etomidate on motor and electroencephalogram seizure duration during electroconvulsive therapy

H. L. Tan, Choon Yee Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An ideal anaesthetic for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) should have rapid onset and offset with no effect on seizure duration, and provide cardiovascular stability during the procedure. Propofol is commonly used, even though it has been shown to shorten seizure duration which might affect the efficacy of ECT Etomidate has been advocated as an alternative. This prospective, randomised, single-blind, crossover study was conducted to compare the effects of etomidate (Etomidate-®Lipuro, B. Braun Ltd, Melsungen, Germany) and propofol (Diprivan®, AstraZeneca, UK) on seizure duration as well as haemodynamic parameters in patients undergoing ECT Twenty patients aged between 18 and 70 years were recruited. Group I received etomidate 0.3 mg/kg for the first course of ECT (Group IA) and propofol 1.5 mg/kg for the second ECT (Group IB), while Group II received propofol for the first ECT (Group IIA) and etomidate for the second ECT (Group IIB). There was a washout period of two to three days in between procedures. Parameters recorded included motor seizure duration, electroencephalogram seizure duration, blood pressure and heart rate. Analysis demonstrated neither period effect nor treatment period interaction. Etomidate was associated with a significantly longer motor and electroencephalogram seizure duration compared with propofol (P <0.01). Neither drug demonstrated consistent effects in suppressing the rise in heart rate or blood pressure during ECT Myoclonus and pain on injection were the most common adverse effects in etomidate group and propofol group respectively. Etomidate is a useful anaesthetic agent for ECT and should be considered in patients with inadequate seizure duration with propofol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-814
Number of pages8
JournalAnaesthesia and Intensive Care
Volume37
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Etomidate
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Propofol
Electroencephalography
Seizures
Anesthetics
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Single-Blind Method
Myoclonus
Cross-Over Studies
Germany
Hemodynamics
Pain

Keywords

  • Electroconvulsive therapy
  • Etomidate
  • Propofol
  • Seizure duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Comparison between the effects of propofol and etomidate on motor and electroencephalogram seizure duration during electroconvulsive therapy. / Tan, H. L.; Lee, Choon Yee.

In: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vol. 37, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 807-814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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