Comparing the ecological footprint with the biodiversity footprint of products

Marlia Mohd Hanafiah, A. Jan Hendriks, Mark A J Huijbregts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compares the ecological footprints with the biodiversity footprints of products that result from land use and carbon dioxide emissions. The biodiversity footprints were quantified using mean species abundance statistics, whereas the ecological footprint refers to the impacts on bioproductivity. We used a data set of 1340 product systems subdivided into 13 product groups, which included various types of energy generation and material production. We found that the importance of direct land use vs. carbon dioxide emissions is different for biodiversity footprints compared to ecological footprints. This difference is particularly relevant if the environmental impact of bio-based products (dominated by direct land use) is compared with the environmental impact of fossil-based products (dominated by CO 2 emissions). Our results also show that the relative importance of different drivers can change over time within the biodiversity footprint and that the relative importance of climate change significantly increased for longer time horizons. As the interpretation of the biodiversity footprint can differ from the ecological footprint, the inclusion of impacts on biodiversity should be considered in the footprint calculation of products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cleaner Production
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

ecological footprint
Biodiversity
footprint
biodiversity
Land use
land use
Environmental impact
Carbon dioxide
environmental impact
carbon dioxide
Climate change
product
Ecological footprint
Statistics
fossil
climate change
energy

Keywords

  • Ecoinvent
  • Land use
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Mean species abundance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Comparing the ecological footprint with the biodiversity footprint of products. / Mohd Hanafiah, Marlia; Hendriks, A. Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A J.

In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 37, 12.2012, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6477445b91254621b25d333a7b72b394,
title = "Comparing the ecological footprint with the biodiversity footprint of products",
abstract = "This study compares the ecological footprints with the biodiversity footprints of products that result from land use and carbon dioxide emissions. The biodiversity footprints were quantified using mean species abundance statistics, whereas the ecological footprint refers to the impacts on bioproductivity. We used a data set of 1340 product systems subdivided into 13 product groups, which included various types of energy generation and material production. We found that the importance of direct land use vs. carbon dioxide emissions is different for biodiversity footprints compared to ecological footprints. This difference is particularly relevant if the environmental impact of bio-based products (dominated by direct land use) is compared with the environmental impact of fossil-based products (dominated by CO 2 emissions). Our results also show that the relative importance of different drivers can change over time within the biodiversity footprint and that the relative importance of climate change significantly increased for longer time horizons. As the interpretation of the biodiversity footprint can differ from the ecological footprint, the inclusion of impacts on biodiversity should be considered in the footprint calculation of products.",
keywords = "Ecoinvent, Land use, Life cycle assessment, Mean species abundance",
author = "{Mohd Hanafiah}, Marlia and Hendriks, {A. Jan} and Huijbregts, {Mark A J}",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.06.016",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "107--114",
journal = "Journal of Cleaner Production",
issn = "0959-6526",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing the ecological footprint with the biodiversity footprint of products

AU - Mohd Hanafiah, Marlia

AU - Hendriks, A. Jan

AU - Huijbregts, Mark A J

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - This study compares the ecological footprints with the biodiversity footprints of products that result from land use and carbon dioxide emissions. The biodiversity footprints were quantified using mean species abundance statistics, whereas the ecological footprint refers to the impacts on bioproductivity. We used a data set of 1340 product systems subdivided into 13 product groups, which included various types of energy generation and material production. We found that the importance of direct land use vs. carbon dioxide emissions is different for biodiversity footprints compared to ecological footprints. This difference is particularly relevant if the environmental impact of bio-based products (dominated by direct land use) is compared with the environmental impact of fossil-based products (dominated by CO 2 emissions). Our results also show that the relative importance of different drivers can change over time within the biodiversity footprint and that the relative importance of climate change significantly increased for longer time horizons. As the interpretation of the biodiversity footprint can differ from the ecological footprint, the inclusion of impacts on biodiversity should be considered in the footprint calculation of products.

AB - This study compares the ecological footprints with the biodiversity footprints of products that result from land use and carbon dioxide emissions. The biodiversity footprints were quantified using mean species abundance statistics, whereas the ecological footprint refers to the impacts on bioproductivity. We used a data set of 1340 product systems subdivided into 13 product groups, which included various types of energy generation and material production. We found that the importance of direct land use vs. carbon dioxide emissions is different for biodiversity footprints compared to ecological footprints. This difference is particularly relevant if the environmental impact of bio-based products (dominated by direct land use) is compared with the environmental impact of fossil-based products (dominated by CO 2 emissions). Our results also show that the relative importance of different drivers can change over time within the biodiversity footprint and that the relative importance of climate change significantly increased for longer time horizons. As the interpretation of the biodiversity footprint can differ from the ecological footprint, the inclusion of impacts on biodiversity should be considered in the footprint calculation of products.

KW - Ecoinvent

KW - Land use

KW - Life cycle assessment

KW - Mean species abundance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865487371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865487371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.06.016

DO - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.06.016

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84865487371

VL - 37

SP - 107

EP - 114

JO - Journal of Cleaner Production

JF - Journal of Cleaner Production

SN - 0959-6526

ER -