Comparing insertion characteristics on nasogastric tube placement by using GlideScope™ visualization vs. MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anaesthetized and intubated patients

Wan Hafsah Wan Ibadullah, Nurlia Yahya, Siti Salmah Ghazali, Esa Kamaruzaman, Chian Yong Liu, Adnan Dan, Jaafar Md Zain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective: This was a prospective, randomized clinical study to compare the success rate of nasogastric tube insertion by using GlideScope™ visualization versus direct MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anesthetized and intubated patients. Methods: Ninety-six ASA I or II patients, aged 18-70 years were recruited and randomized into two groups using either technique. The time taken from insertion of the nasogastric tube from the nostril until the calculated length of tube had been inserted was recorded. The success rate of nasogastric tube insertion was evaluated in terms of successful insertion in the first attempt. Complications associated with the insertion techniques were recorded. Results: The results showed success rates of 74.5% in the GlideScope™ Group as compared to 58.3% in the MacIntosh Group (p = 0.10). For the failed attempts, the nasogastric tube was successfully inserted in all cases using rescue techniques. The duration taken in the first attempt for both techniques was not statistically significant; Group A was 17.2. ±. 9.3. s as compared to Group B, with a duration of 18.9. ±. 13.0. s (p = 0.57). A total of 33 patients developed complications during insertion of the nasogastric tube, 39.4% in Group A and 60.6% in Group B (p = 0.15). The most common complications, which occurred, were coiling, followed by bleeding and kinking. Conclusion: This study showed that using the GlideScope™ to facilitate nasogastric tube insertion was comparable to the use of the MacIntosh laryngoscope in terms of successful rate of insertion and complications.

Original languagePortuguese
JournalRevista Brasileira de Anestesiologia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Direct laryngoscope
  • Nasogastric tube
  • Videolaryngoscope

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Comparing insertion characteristics on nasogastric tube placement by using GlideScope™ visualization vs. MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anaesthetized and intubated patients",
abstract = "Background and objective: This was a prospective, randomized clinical study to compare the success rate of nasogastric tube insertion by using GlideScope™ visualization versus direct MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anesthetized and intubated patients. Methods: Ninety-six ASA I or II patients, aged 18-70 years were recruited and randomized into two groups using either technique. The time taken from insertion of the nasogastric tube from the nostril until the calculated length of tube had been inserted was recorded. The success rate of nasogastric tube insertion was evaluated in terms of successful insertion in the first attempt. Complications associated with the insertion techniques were recorded. Results: The results showed success rates of 74.5{\%} in the GlideScope™ Group as compared to 58.3{\%} in the MacIntosh Group (p = 0.10). For the failed attempts, the nasogastric tube was successfully inserted in all cases using rescue techniques. The duration taken in the first attempt for both techniques was not statistically significant; Group A was 17.2. ±. 9.3. s as compared to Group B, with a duration of 18.9. ±. 13.0. s (p = 0.57). A total of 33 patients developed complications during insertion of the nasogastric tube, 39.4{\%} in Group A and 60.6{\%} in Group B (p = 0.15). The most common complications, which occurred, were coiling, followed by bleeding and kinking. Conclusion: This study showed that using the GlideScope™ to facilitate nasogastric tube insertion was comparable to the use of the MacIntosh laryngoscope in terms of successful rate of insertion and complications.",
keywords = "Complications, Direct laryngoscope, Nasogastric tube, Videolaryngoscope",
author = "{Wan Ibadullah}, {Wan Hafsah} and Nurlia Yahya and Ghazali, {Siti Salmah} and Esa Kamaruzaman and Liu, {Chian Yong} and Adnan Dan and {Md Zain}, Jaafar",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.bjan.2016.04.007",
language = "Portuguese",
journal = "Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing insertion characteristics on nasogastric tube placement by using GlideScope™ visualization vs. MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anaesthetized and intubated patients

AU - Wan Ibadullah, Wan Hafsah

AU - Yahya, Nurlia

AU - Ghazali, Siti Salmah

AU - Kamaruzaman, Esa

AU - Liu, Chian Yong

AU - Dan, Adnan

AU - Md Zain, Jaafar

PY - 2014/7/10

Y1 - 2014/7/10

N2 - Background and objective: This was a prospective, randomized clinical study to compare the success rate of nasogastric tube insertion by using GlideScope™ visualization versus direct MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anesthetized and intubated patients. Methods: Ninety-six ASA I or II patients, aged 18-70 years were recruited and randomized into two groups using either technique. The time taken from insertion of the nasogastric tube from the nostril until the calculated length of tube had been inserted was recorded. The success rate of nasogastric tube insertion was evaluated in terms of successful insertion in the first attempt. Complications associated with the insertion techniques were recorded. Results: The results showed success rates of 74.5% in the GlideScope™ Group as compared to 58.3% in the MacIntosh Group (p = 0.10). For the failed attempts, the nasogastric tube was successfully inserted in all cases using rescue techniques. The duration taken in the first attempt for both techniques was not statistically significant; Group A was 17.2. ±. 9.3. s as compared to Group B, with a duration of 18.9. ±. 13.0. s (p = 0.57). A total of 33 patients developed complications during insertion of the nasogastric tube, 39.4% in Group A and 60.6% in Group B (p = 0.15). The most common complications, which occurred, were coiling, followed by bleeding and kinking. Conclusion: This study showed that using the GlideScope™ to facilitate nasogastric tube insertion was comparable to the use of the MacIntosh laryngoscope in terms of successful rate of insertion and complications.

AB - Background and objective: This was a prospective, randomized clinical study to compare the success rate of nasogastric tube insertion by using GlideScope™ visualization versus direct MacIntosh laryngoscope assistance in anesthetized and intubated patients. Methods: Ninety-six ASA I or II patients, aged 18-70 years were recruited and randomized into two groups using either technique. The time taken from insertion of the nasogastric tube from the nostril until the calculated length of tube had been inserted was recorded. The success rate of nasogastric tube insertion was evaluated in terms of successful insertion in the first attempt. Complications associated with the insertion techniques were recorded. Results: The results showed success rates of 74.5% in the GlideScope™ Group as compared to 58.3% in the MacIntosh Group (p = 0.10). For the failed attempts, the nasogastric tube was successfully inserted in all cases using rescue techniques. The duration taken in the first attempt for both techniques was not statistically significant; Group A was 17.2. ±. 9.3. s as compared to Group B, with a duration of 18.9. ±. 13.0. s (p = 0.57). A total of 33 patients developed complications during insertion of the nasogastric tube, 39.4% in Group A and 60.6% in Group B (p = 0.15). The most common complications, which occurred, were coiling, followed by bleeding and kinking. Conclusion: This study showed that using the GlideScope™ to facilitate nasogastric tube insertion was comparable to the use of the MacIntosh laryngoscope in terms of successful rate of insertion and complications.

KW - Complications

KW - Direct laryngoscope

KW - Nasogastric tube

KW - Videolaryngoscope

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SN - 0034-7094

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