Color vision deficiency in retinitis pigmentosa

Rokiah Omar, Stephan Dain, Peter Herse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined which color vision test was superior in the detection of acquired color vision deficiencies and the relative magnitudes of red-green (RG) and blue-yellow (BY) discrimination losses in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: Color vision examinations were conducted using Standard Pseudoisochromatic Plates Part 2 (SPP Part 2) and a flicker threshold test (TMT) in 21 RP and 21 age- and sex-matched normals. The TMT test consists of luminance, BY and RG flicker tests. Relative Operating Characteristic analysis (ROC) was used to determine the effectiveness of each test. Bigger ROC area gain and high performance (%) indicate a better test. Regression and correlation analyses were used to determine the relative magnitudes of RG and BY discrimination losses for the SPP Part 2. For TMT the findings were represented graphically where the mean log sensitivity was plotted against the frequency of mean luminance; RG and BY flicker individually and the range was plotted with the 5th and 95th percentile. Results: Both tests were able to determine BY and RG acquired color vision deficiencies in RP patients. SPP Part 2 showed the highest area gain (0.39) and performance (78%). The TMT generally showed less area gain and performance compared to SPP Part 2. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis on the RG and BY SPP Part 2 test plates showed a strong relationship (r = 0.96, p < 0.0001) between RG and BY discrimination losses suggesting that RP patients suffer roughly equal losses in RG and BY discrimination. Analysis of the TMT also showed an equal loss of sensitivity across all the frequencies in all three tests suggesting an overall reduction of sensitivity confirming the non-specific frequency and non-color specific loss. Conclusions: The SPP Part 2 appears to be a superior test compared to TMT in detecting acquired color vision deficiencies in RP patients. RP subjects also suffer both RG and BY acquired color vision deficiencies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)684-688
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Congress Series
Volume1282
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

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Color Vision Defects
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Color Vision
Vision Tests
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Color vision
  • Retinitis pigmentosa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Color vision deficiency in retinitis pigmentosa. / Omar, Rokiah; Dain, Stephan; Herse, Peter.

In: International Congress Series, Vol. 1282, 09.2005, p. 684-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Omar, Rokiah ; Dain, Stephan ; Herse, Peter. / Color vision deficiency in retinitis pigmentosa. In: International Congress Series. 2005 ; Vol. 1282. pp. 684-688.
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