Collagen-Coated Polylactic-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells as a potential nerve conduit

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Abstract

Background. Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps pose various drawbacks. Nerve tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration using artificial neural conduits has emerged as a promising alternative. Objectives. To develop an artificial nerve conduit using collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) and to analyse the survivability and propagating ability of the neuro-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells in this conduit. Material and Methods. The PLGA conduit was constructed by dip-molding method and coated with collagen by immersing the conduit in collagen bath. The ultra structure of the conduits were examined before they were seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSC) and implanted sub-muscularly on nude mice thighs. The non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with nMSC and non-seeded non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit were also implanted for comparison purposes. The survivability and propagation ability of nMSC was studied by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Results. The collagen-coated conduits had a smooth inner wall and a highly porous outer wall. Conduits coated with collagen and seeded with nMSCs produced the most number of cells after 3 weeks. The best conduit based on the number of cells contained within it after 3 weeks was the collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with neuro-transdifferentiated cells. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit found to be suitable for attachment, survival and proliferation of the nMSC. Minimal cell infiltration was found in the implanted conduits where nearly all of the cells found in the cell seeded conduits are non-mouse origin and have neural cell markers, which exhibit the biocompatibility of the conduits. Conclusions. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit is biocompatible, non-cytotoxic and suitable for use as artificial nerve conduits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-362
Number of pages10
JournalAdvances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume23
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

glycolic acid
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Collagen
Cell Count
Nerve Tissue
Nerve Regeneration
poly(lactic acid)
Tissue Engineering
Thigh
Baths
Biocompatibility
Tissue engineering
Infiltration
Nude Mice
Grafts
Molding

Keywords

  • Collagen
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Nerve regeneration
  • PLGA
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{f1b5381ca5504298be18b04455bd42a5,
title = "Collagen-Coated Polylactic-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells as a potential nerve conduit",
abstract = "Background. Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps pose various drawbacks. Nerve tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration using artificial neural conduits has emerged as a promising alternative. Objectives. To develop an artificial nerve conduit using collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) and to analyse the survivability and propagating ability of the neuro-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells in this conduit. Material and Methods. The PLGA conduit was constructed by dip-molding method and coated with collagen by immersing the conduit in collagen bath. The ultra structure of the conduits were examined before they were seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSC) and implanted sub-muscularly on nude mice thighs. The non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with nMSC and non-seeded non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit were also implanted for comparison purposes. The survivability and propagation ability of nMSC was studied by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Results. The collagen-coated conduits had a smooth inner wall and a highly porous outer wall. Conduits coated with collagen and seeded with nMSCs produced the most number of cells after 3 weeks. The best conduit based on the number of cells contained within it after 3 weeks was the collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with neuro-transdifferentiated cells. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit found to be suitable for attachment, survival and proliferation of the nMSC. Minimal cell infiltration was found in the implanted conduits where nearly all of the cells found in the cell seeded conduits are non-mouse origin and have neural cell markers, which exhibit the biocompatibility of the conduits. Conclusions. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit is biocompatible, non-cytotoxic and suitable for use as artificial nerve conduits.",
keywords = "Collagen, Mesenchymal stem cells, Nerve regeneration, PLGA, Tissue engineering",
author = "Sulong, {Ahmad Fadzli} and Fiassan, {Nur Hidayah} and Ng, {Min Hwei} and Lokanathan Yogeswaran and {Selvi Naicker}, Amaramalar and Shalimar Abdullah and Yusof, {Mohd Reusmaazran} and Ohnmar Htwe and Ruszymah Idrus and {Mohamed Haflah}, {Nor Hazla}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "353--362",
journal = "Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine",
issn = "1899-5276",
publisher = "Wroclaw Medical University",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Collagen-Coated Polylactic-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells as a potential nerve conduit

AU - Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli

AU - Fiassan, Nur Hidayah

AU - Ng, Min Hwei

AU - Yogeswaran, Lokanathan

AU - Selvi Naicker, Amaramalar

AU - Abdullah, Shalimar

AU - Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran

AU - Htwe, Ohnmar

AU - Idrus, Ruszymah

AU - Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background. Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps pose various drawbacks. Nerve tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration using artificial neural conduits has emerged as a promising alternative. Objectives. To develop an artificial nerve conduit using collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) and to analyse the survivability and propagating ability of the neuro-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells in this conduit. Material and Methods. The PLGA conduit was constructed by dip-molding method and coated with collagen by immersing the conduit in collagen bath. The ultra structure of the conduits were examined before they were seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSC) and implanted sub-muscularly on nude mice thighs. The non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with nMSC and non-seeded non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit were also implanted for comparison purposes. The survivability and propagation ability of nMSC was studied by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Results. The collagen-coated conduits had a smooth inner wall and a highly porous outer wall. Conduits coated with collagen and seeded with nMSCs produced the most number of cells after 3 weeks. The best conduit based on the number of cells contained within it after 3 weeks was the collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with neuro-transdifferentiated cells. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit found to be suitable for attachment, survival and proliferation of the nMSC. Minimal cell infiltration was found in the implanted conduits where nearly all of the cells found in the cell seeded conduits are non-mouse origin and have neural cell markers, which exhibit the biocompatibility of the conduits. Conclusions. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit is biocompatible, non-cytotoxic and suitable for use as artificial nerve conduits.

AB - Background. Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps pose various drawbacks. Nerve tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration using artificial neural conduits has emerged as a promising alternative. Objectives. To develop an artificial nerve conduit using collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) and to analyse the survivability and propagating ability of the neuro-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells in this conduit. Material and Methods. The PLGA conduit was constructed by dip-molding method and coated with collagen by immersing the conduit in collagen bath. The ultra structure of the conduits were examined before they were seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSC) and implanted sub-muscularly on nude mice thighs. The non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with nMSC and non-seeded non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit were also implanted for comparison purposes. The survivability and propagation ability of nMSC was studied by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Results. The collagen-coated conduits had a smooth inner wall and a highly porous outer wall. Conduits coated with collagen and seeded with nMSCs produced the most number of cells after 3 weeks. The best conduit based on the number of cells contained within it after 3 weeks was the collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with neuro-transdifferentiated cells. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit found to be suitable for attachment, survival and proliferation of the nMSC. Minimal cell infiltration was found in the implanted conduits where nearly all of the cells found in the cell seeded conduits are non-mouse origin and have neural cell markers, which exhibit the biocompatibility of the conduits. Conclusions. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit is biocompatible, non-cytotoxic and suitable for use as artificial nerve conduits.

KW - Collagen

KW - Mesenchymal stem cells

KW - Nerve regeneration

KW - PLGA

KW - Tissue engineering

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M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 353

EP - 362

JO - Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine

JF - Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine

SN - 1899-5276

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