Cognitive frailty among Malaysian older adults: Baseline findings from the LRGS TUA cohort study

Nurul Fatin Malek Rivan, Suzana Shahar, Nor Fadilah Rajab, Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh, Normah Che Din, Mahadzir Hazlina, Tengku Aizan Tengku Abdul Hamid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study was aimed at determining the presence of cognitive frailty and its associated factors among community-dwelling older adults from the “LRGS-Towards Useful Aging (TUA)” longitudinal study. Patients and methods: The available data related to cognitive frailty among a sub-sample of older adults aged 60 years and above (n=815) from two states in Malaysia were analysed. In the LRGS-TUA study, a comprehensive interview-based questionnaire was administered to obtain the socio-demographic information of the participants, followed by assessments to examine the cognitive function, functional status, dietary intake, lifestyle, psychosocial status and biomarkers associated with cognitive frailty. The factors associated with cognitive frailty were assessed using a bivariate logistic regression (BLR). Results: The majority of the older adults were categorized as robust (68.4%), followed by cognitively pre-frail (37.4%) and cognitively frail (2.2%). The data on the cognitively frail and pre-frail groups were combined for comparison with the robust group. A hierarchical BLR indicated that advancing age (OR=1.04, 95% CI:1.01–1.08, p<0.05) and depression (OR=1.49, 95% CI:1.34–1.65, p<0.001) scored lower on the Activity of Daily Living (ADL) scale (OR=0.98, 95% CI:0.96–0.99, p<0.05), while low social support (OR=0.98, 95% CI:0.97–0.99, p<0.05) and low niacin intake (OR=0.94, 95% CI:0.89–0.99, p<0.05) were found to be significant factors for cognitive frailty. Higher oxidative stress (MDA) and lower telomerase activity were also associated with cognitive frailty (p<0.05). Conclusion: Older age, a lower niacin intake, lack of social support, depression and lower functional status were identified as significant factors associated with cognitive frailty among older Malaysian adults. MDA and telomerase activity can be used as potential biomarkers for the identification of cognitive frailty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1343-1352
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Niacin
Telomerase
Social Support
Cohort Studies
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
Depression
Independent Living
Malaysia
Activities of Daily Living
Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Life Style
Oxidative Stress
Demography
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cognitive frailty
  • Frailty
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Cognitive frailty among Malaysian older adults : Baseline findings from the LRGS TUA cohort study. / Rivan, Nurul Fatin Malek; Shahar, Suzana; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur; Che Din, Normah; Hazlina, Mahadzir; Hamid, Tengku Aizan Tengku Abdul.

In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Vol. 14, 01.01.2019, p. 1343-1352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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author = "Rivan, {Nurul Fatin Malek} and Suzana Shahar and Rajab, {Nor Fadilah} and {Ajit Singh}, {Devinder Kaur} and {Che Din}, Normah and Mahadzir Hazlina and Hamid, {Tengku Aizan Tengku Abdul}",
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AU - Rivan, Nurul Fatin Malek

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AU - Rajab, Nor Fadilah

AU - Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur

AU - Che Din, Normah

AU - Hazlina, Mahadzir

AU - Hamid, Tengku Aizan Tengku Abdul

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N2 - Purpose: This study was aimed at determining the presence of cognitive frailty and its associated factors among community-dwelling older adults from the “LRGS-Towards Useful Aging (TUA)” longitudinal study. Patients and methods: The available data related to cognitive frailty among a sub-sample of older adults aged 60 years and above (n=815) from two states in Malaysia were analysed. In the LRGS-TUA study, a comprehensive interview-based questionnaire was administered to obtain the socio-demographic information of the participants, followed by assessments to examine the cognitive function, functional status, dietary intake, lifestyle, psychosocial status and biomarkers associated with cognitive frailty. The factors associated with cognitive frailty were assessed using a bivariate logistic regression (BLR). Results: The majority of the older adults were categorized as robust (68.4%), followed by cognitively pre-frail (37.4%) and cognitively frail (2.2%). The data on the cognitively frail and pre-frail groups were combined for comparison with the robust group. A hierarchical BLR indicated that advancing age (OR=1.04, 95% CI:1.01–1.08, p<0.05) and depression (OR=1.49, 95% CI:1.34–1.65, p<0.001) scored lower on the Activity of Daily Living (ADL) scale (OR=0.98, 95% CI:0.96–0.99, p<0.05), while low social support (OR=0.98, 95% CI:0.97–0.99, p<0.05) and low niacin intake (OR=0.94, 95% CI:0.89–0.99, p<0.05) were found to be significant factors for cognitive frailty. Higher oxidative stress (MDA) and lower telomerase activity were also associated with cognitive frailty (p<0.05). Conclusion: Older age, a lower niacin intake, lack of social support, depression and lower functional status were identified as significant factors associated with cognitive frailty among older Malaysian adults. MDA and telomerase activity can be used as potential biomarkers for the identification of cognitive frailty.

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KW - Cognitive frailty

KW - Frailty

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

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