Clinical depression while caring for loved ones with breast cancer

Nik Ruzyanei Nik Jaafar, Siti Hazrah Selamat Din, Suriati Mohamed Saini, Siti Nor Aizah Ahmad, Marhani Midin, Hatta Sidi, Umi Adzlin Silim, Azlin Baharudin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The period of the cancer patients undergoing treatment is also the most stressful time for their family caregivers. This study aimed to determine the rates of major depressive disorder and dysthymia; and their associated factors in the caregivers during this time. Methods One hundred and thirty caregiver-patient dyads attending the oncology centre for breast cancer treatment participated in this cross-sectional study. While the data on the patients' socio-demographic and illness characteristics were obtained from their medical record, the caregivers completed three self-report measures: 1) socio-demography and the caregiving factor questionnaire, 2) Multi-dimensional Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and 3) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Subsequently, those with "probable depression" identified from the DASS-21 score were interviewed using The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to obtain the diagnoses of depressive disorders. Results Twenty-three of the 130 caregivers (17.69%) were diagnosed to have depressive disorders, where 12.31% (n = 16) had major depressive disorder and 5.38% (n = 7) had dysthymic disorder. Factors associated with depression include ethnicity, duration of caregiving, the patients' functional status and the caregivers' education level. Logistic regression analysis showed that the patients' functional status (p < 0.05, OR = 0.23, CI = 0.06-0.86) and the caregivers' education level (p < 0.05, CI = 9.30, CI = 1.82-47.57) were significantly associated with depression in the caregivers attending to breast cancer patients on oncology treatment. Conclusions A significant proportion of family caregivers were clinically depressed while caring for their loved ones. Depression in this population is a complex interplay between the patients' factors and the caregivers' factors.

Original languageEnglish
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume55
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Depression
Breast Neoplasms
Major Depressive Disorder
Depressive Disorder
Dysthymic Disorder
Demography
Education
Social Support
Self Report
Medical Records
Therapeutics
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Clinical depression while caring for loved ones with breast cancer. / Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Selamat Din, Siti Hazrah; Mohamed Saini, Suriati; Ahmad, Siti Nor Aizah; Midin, Marhani; Sidi, Hatta; Silim, Umi Adzlin; Baharudin, Azlin.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 55, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e4f05bbad23a47b5bc351fda7b385920,
title = "Clinical depression while caring for loved ones with breast cancer",
abstract = "Introduction The period of the cancer patients undergoing treatment is also the most stressful time for their family caregivers. This study aimed to determine the rates of major depressive disorder and dysthymia; and their associated factors in the caregivers during this time. Methods One hundred and thirty caregiver-patient dyads attending the oncology centre for breast cancer treatment participated in this cross-sectional study. While the data on the patients' socio-demographic and illness characteristics were obtained from their medical record, the caregivers completed three self-report measures: 1) socio-demography and the caregiving factor questionnaire, 2) Multi-dimensional Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and 3) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Subsequently, those with {"}probable depression{"} identified from the DASS-21 score were interviewed using The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to obtain the diagnoses of depressive disorders. Results Twenty-three of the 130 caregivers (17.69{\%}) were diagnosed to have depressive disorders, where 12.31{\%} (n = 16) had major depressive disorder and 5.38{\%} (n = 7) had dysthymic disorder. Factors associated with depression include ethnicity, duration of caregiving, the patients' functional status and the caregivers' education level. Logistic regression analysis showed that the patients' functional status (p < 0.05, OR = 0.23, CI = 0.06-0.86) and the caregivers' education level (p < 0.05, CI = 9.30, CI = 1.82-47.57) were significantly associated with depression in the caregivers attending to breast cancer patients on oncology treatment. Conclusions A significant proportion of family caregivers were clinically depressed while caring for their loved ones. Depression in this population is a complex interplay between the patients' factors and the caregivers' factors.",
author = "{Nik Jaafar}, {Nik Ruzyanei} and {Selamat Din}, {Siti Hazrah} and {Mohamed Saini}, Suriati and Ahmad, {Siti Nor Aizah} and Marhani Midin and Hatta Sidi and Silim, {Umi Adzlin} and Azlin Baharudin",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.03.003",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
journal = "Comprehensive Psychiatry",
issn = "0010-440X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical depression while caring for loved ones with breast cancer

AU - Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei

AU - Selamat Din, Siti Hazrah

AU - Mohamed Saini, Suriati

AU - Ahmad, Siti Nor Aizah

AU - Midin, Marhani

AU - Sidi, Hatta

AU - Silim, Umi Adzlin

AU - Baharudin, Azlin

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Introduction The period of the cancer patients undergoing treatment is also the most stressful time for their family caregivers. This study aimed to determine the rates of major depressive disorder and dysthymia; and their associated factors in the caregivers during this time. Methods One hundred and thirty caregiver-patient dyads attending the oncology centre for breast cancer treatment participated in this cross-sectional study. While the data on the patients' socio-demographic and illness characteristics were obtained from their medical record, the caregivers completed three self-report measures: 1) socio-demography and the caregiving factor questionnaire, 2) Multi-dimensional Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and 3) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Subsequently, those with "probable depression" identified from the DASS-21 score were interviewed using The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to obtain the diagnoses of depressive disorders. Results Twenty-three of the 130 caregivers (17.69%) were diagnosed to have depressive disorders, where 12.31% (n = 16) had major depressive disorder and 5.38% (n = 7) had dysthymic disorder. Factors associated with depression include ethnicity, duration of caregiving, the patients' functional status and the caregivers' education level. Logistic regression analysis showed that the patients' functional status (p < 0.05, OR = 0.23, CI = 0.06-0.86) and the caregivers' education level (p < 0.05, CI = 9.30, CI = 1.82-47.57) were significantly associated with depression in the caregivers attending to breast cancer patients on oncology treatment. Conclusions A significant proportion of family caregivers were clinically depressed while caring for their loved ones. Depression in this population is a complex interplay between the patients' factors and the caregivers' factors.

AB - Introduction The period of the cancer patients undergoing treatment is also the most stressful time for their family caregivers. This study aimed to determine the rates of major depressive disorder and dysthymia; and their associated factors in the caregivers during this time. Methods One hundred and thirty caregiver-patient dyads attending the oncology centre for breast cancer treatment participated in this cross-sectional study. While the data on the patients' socio-demographic and illness characteristics were obtained from their medical record, the caregivers completed three self-report measures: 1) socio-demography and the caregiving factor questionnaire, 2) Multi-dimensional Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and 3) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Subsequently, those with "probable depression" identified from the DASS-21 score were interviewed using The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to obtain the diagnoses of depressive disorders. Results Twenty-three of the 130 caregivers (17.69%) were diagnosed to have depressive disorders, where 12.31% (n = 16) had major depressive disorder and 5.38% (n = 7) had dysthymic disorder. Factors associated with depression include ethnicity, duration of caregiving, the patients' functional status and the caregivers' education level. Logistic regression analysis showed that the patients' functional status (p < 0.05, OR = 0.23, CI = 0.06-0.86) and the caregivers' education level (p < 0.05, CI = 9.30, CI = 1.82-47.57) were significantly associated with depression in the caregivers attending to breast cancer patients on oncology treatment. Conclusions A significant proportion of family caregivers were clinically depressed while caring for their loved ones. Depression in this population is a complex interplay between the patients' factors and the caregivers' factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889889271&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889889271&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.03.003

DO - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.03.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 23706655

AN - SCOPUS:84889889271

VL - 55

JO - Comprehensive Psychiatry

JF - Comprehensive Psychiatry

SN - 0010-440X

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -