Climbing the Ladder: Socioeconomic Mobility in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates the existence and extent of intergenerational mobility in Malaysia in terms of educational attainment, occupational skills level, and income level. It compares the status of working adults born between the years 1945 and 1960 and their adult children born between 1975 and 1985, using non-linear transition matrix techniques. On average, the majority of adult children have better educational attainment and occupational skills level compared with their parents. Income mobility, in absolute and relative terms, is highest among children born to parents in the lowest income quintile. The results of a logistic regression model show that education, assets ownership, gender, and location matter for upward mobility. Moving forward, there will be difficulties for the children from poor families to move up the socioeconomic ladder because of changes in policies. An inclusive development approach is vital in enhancing socioeconomic mobility to promote social cohesion, economic growth, and greater equity for the next generation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalAsian Economic Papers
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malaysia
parents
intergenerational mobility
income
social cohesion
assets
equity
economic growth
low income
logistics
regression
Socio-economics
gender
education
Educational attainment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Climbing the Ladder : Socioeconomic Mobility in Malaysia. / Khalid, Muhammed Abdul.

In: Asian Economic Papers, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.10.2018, p. 1-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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