Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and Human Health Implications in the Asia Pacific Region

Jamal Hisham Hashim, Zailina Hashim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Asia Pacific region is regarded as the most disaster-prone area of the world. Since 2000, 1.2 billion people have been exposed to hydrometeorological hazards alone through 1215 disaster events. The impacts of climate change on meteorological phenomena and environmental consequences are well documented. However, the impacts on health are more elusive. Nevertheless, climate change is believed to alter weather patterns on the regional scale, giving rise to extreme weather events. The impacts from extreme weather events are definitely more acute and traumatic in nature, leading to deaths and injuries, as well as debilitating and fatal communicable diseases. Extreme weather events include heat waves, cold waves, floods, droughts, hurricanes, tropical cyclones, heavy rain, and snowfalls. Globally, within the 20-year period from 1993 to 2012, more than 530 000 people died as a direct result of almost 15 000 extreme weather events, with losses of more than US$2.5 trillion in purchasing power parity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8S-14S
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Public Health
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Climate Change
Weather
Health
Cyclonic Storms
Disasters
Infrared Rays
Rain
Droughts
Parity
Communicable Diseases
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Asia Pacific
  • climate change
  • extreme weather events
  • health impacts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and Human Health Implications in the Asia Pacific Region. / Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Hashim, Zailina.

In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, Vol. 28, 2014, p. 8S-14S.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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