Chronic condition as a mediator between metabolic syndrome and cognition among community-dwelling older adults

The moderating role of sex

Hui Foh Foong, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Rahimah Ibrahim, Sharifah Azizah Haron, Suzana Shahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Metabolic syndrome and chronic conditions are significant predictors of cognition; however, few studies have examined how they work together in predicting cognition in old age. Therefore, the present study examines whether a chronic condition mediates the association between metabolic syndrome and cognition. In addition, it discusses the moderating role of sex in the relationships between metabolic syndrome, chronic conditions and cognition. Methods: Secondary analysis was carried out of data from the Malaysian national survey that involved 2322 community residents aged 60 years or older in Peninsular Malaysia. Cognition was measured by the digit symbol substitution test. Metabolic syndrome was assessed by five biomarkers: triglyceride, fasting blood sugar, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol ratio and body mass index. Chronic conditions were assessed by self-reported medical history. The structural equation modeling technique was used to analyze the mediation and moderation tests. Results: The number of chronic conditions partially mediated the association between metabolic syndrome and cognition. Men and women did not differ in the relationship between metabolic syndrome and cognition; however, the number of chronic conditions was found to be negatively associated with cognition in older women, but not in men. Conclusions: Metabolic syndrome might increase the likelihood of older adults to suffer from more chronic conditions; these responses might reduce their cognition. To prevent cognitive decline in old age, specific intervention to minimize the number of chronic conditions by reducing their vascular risk factors is warranted, especially among older women.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017

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Independent Living
Cognition
cognition
community
old age
Blood Pressure
Malaysia
secondary analysis
substitution
mediation
Blood Glucose
Fasting
symbol
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Biomarkers
Cholesterol
resident

Keywords

  • Chronic condition
  • Cognition
  • Mediating role
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Moderating role

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Chronic condition as a mediator between metabolic syndrome and cognition among community-dwelling older adults : The moderating role of sex. / Foong, Hui Foh; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Haron, Sharifah Azizah; Shahar, Suzana.

In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Haron, Sharifah Azizah

AU - Shahar, Suzana

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