Children's exposure to food advertising on free-to-air television: An Asia-Pacific perspective

Bridget Kelly, Lana Hebden, Lesley King, Yang Xiao, Yang Yu, Gengsheng He, Liangli Li, Lingxia Zeng, Hamam Hadi, Tilakavati Karupaiah, Ng See Hoe, Mohd Ismail Noor, Jihyun Yoon, Hyogyoo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is an established link between food promotions and children's food purchase and consumption. Children in developing countries may be more vulnerable to food promotions given the relative novelty of advertising in these markets. This study aimed to determine the scope of television food advertising to children across the Asia-Pacific to inform policies to restrict this marketing. Six sites were sampled, including from China, Indonesia, Malaysia and South Korea. At each site, 192 h of television were recorded (4 days, 16 h/day, three channels) from May to October 2012. Advertised foods were categorized as core/healthy, non-core/unhealthy or miscellaneous, and by product type. Twenty-seven percent of advertisements were for food/beverages, and the most frequently advertised product was sugar-sweetened drinks. Rates of non-core food advertising were highest during viewing times most popular with children, when between 3 (South Korea) and 15 (Indonesia) non-core food advertisements were broadcast each hour. Children in the Asia-Pacific are exposed to high volumes of unhealthy food/beverage television advertising. Different policy arrangements for food advertising are likely to contribute to regional variations in advertising patterns. Cities with the lowest advertising rates can be identified as exemplars of good policy practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-152
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Promotion International
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

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Television
television
Air
air
food
Food
Food and Beverages
Republic of Korea
Indonesia
South Korea
promotion
Nutrition Policy
Malaysia
Marketing
regional difference
Developing Countries
broadcast
China
purchase
marketing

Keywords

  • advertising
  • food
  • marketing
  • television

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Children's exposure to food advertising on free-to-air television : An Asia-Pacific perspective. / Kelly, Bridget; Hebden, Lana; King, Lesley; Xiao, Yang; Yu, Yang; He, Gengsheng; Li, Liangli; Zeng, Lingxia; Hadi, Hamam; Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Hoe, Ng See; Noor, Mohd Ismail; Yoon, Jihyun; Kim, Hyogyoo.

In: Health Promotion International, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 144-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kelly, B, Hebden, L, King, L, Xiao, Y, Yu, Y, He, G, Li, L, Zeng, L, Hadi, H, Karupaiah, T, Hoe, NS, Noor, MI, Yoon, J & Kim, H 2016, 'Children's exposure to food advertising on free-to-air television: An Asia-Pacific perspective', Health Promotion International, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 144-152. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dau055
Kelly, Bridget ; Hebden, Lana ; King, Lesley ; Xiao, Yang ; Yu, Yang ; He, Gengsheng ; Li, Liangli ; Zeng, Lingxia ; Hadi, Hamam ; Karupaiah, Tilakavati ; Hoe, Ng See ; Noor, Mohd Ismail ; Yoon, Jihyun ; Kim, Hyogyoo. / Children's exposure to food advertising on free-to-air television : An Asia-Pacific perspective. In: Health Promotion International. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 144-152.
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