Characterization and biocompatibility evaluation of bacterial cellulose-based wound dressing hydrogel: Effect of electron beam irradiation doses and concentration of acrylic acid

Najwa Mohamad, Fhataheyah Buang, Mohamad Azwani Shah Mat Lazim, Naveed Ahmad, Claire Martin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of bacterial cellulose (BC)-based hydrogel has been gaining attention owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. This study was designed to investigate the effect of radiation doses and acrylic acid (AA) composition on in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of BC/AA as wound dressing materials. Physical properties of the hydrogel, that is, thickness, adhesiveness, rate of water vapor transmission, and swelling were measured. Moreover, the effect of these parameters on skin irritation and sensitization, blood compatibility, and cytotoxicity was studied. Increased AA content and irradiation doses increased the thickness, crosslinking density, and improved the mechanical properties of the hydrogel, but reduced its adhesiveness. The swelling capacity of the hydrogel increased significantly with a decrease in the AA composition in simulated wound fluid. The water vapor permeability of polymeric hydrogels was in the range of 2035-2666[g/(m-2day-1)]. Dermal irritation and sensitization test demonstrated that the hydrogel was nonirritant and nonallergic. The BC/AA hydrogel was found to be nontoxic to primary human dermal fibroblast skin cells with viability >88% and was found to be biocompatible with blood with a low hemolytic index (0.80-1.30%). Collectively, these results indicate that these hydrogels have the potential to be used as wound dressings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Hydrogel
Biocompatibility
Hydrogels
Cellulose
Acrylics
Dosimetry
Electron beams
Irradiation
Acids
Steam
Swelling
Skin
Blood
Water vapor
Biodegradability
Fibroblasts
Cytotoxicity
Chemical analysis
Crosslinking
acrylic acid

Keywords

  • Adhesiveness
  • Dermal toxicity
  • Hemocompatibility
  • Hydrogel wound dressing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

@article{6e0348d03af44b7282fca59b5a6b2df1,
title = "Characterization and biocompatibility evaluation of bacterial cellulose-based wound dressing hydrogel: Effect of electron beam irradiation doses and concentration of acrylic acid",
abstract = "The use of bacterial cellulose (BC)-based hydrogel has been gaining attention owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. This study was designed to investigate the effect of radiation doses and acrylic acid (AA) composition on in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of BC/AA as wound dressing materials. Physical properties of the hydrogel, that is, thickness, adhesiveness, rate of water vapor transmission, and swelling were measured. Moreover, the effect of these parameters on skin irritation and sensitization, blood compatibility, and cytotoxicity was studied. Increased AA content and irradiation doses increased the thickness, crosslinking density, and improved the mechanical properties of the hydrogel, but reduced its adhesiveness. The swelling capacity of the hydrogel increased significantly with a decrease in the AA composition in simulated wound fluid. The water vapor permeability of polymeric hydrogels was in the range of 2035-2666[g/(m-2day-1)]. Dermal irritation and sensitization test demonstrated that the hydrogel was nonirritant and nonallergic. The BC/AA hydrogel was found to be nontoxic to primary human dermal fibroblast skin cells with viability >88{\%} and was found to be biocompatible with blood with a low hemolytic index (0.80-1.30{\%}). Collectively, these results indicate that these hydrogels have the potential to be used as wound dressings.",
keywords = "Adhesiveness, Dermal toxicity, Hemocompatibility, Hydrogel wound dressing",
author = "Najwa Mohamad and Fhataheyah Buang and {Mat Lazim}, {Mohamad Azwani Shah} and Naveed Ahmad and Claire Martin and {Mohd Amin}, {Mohd Cairul Iqbal}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1002/jbm.b.33776",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Biomedical Materials Research",
issn = "0021-9304",
publisher = "Heterocorporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization and biocompatibility evaluation of bacterial cellulose-based wound dressing hydrogel

T2 - Effect of electron beam irradiation doses and concentration of acrylic acid

AU - Mohamad, Najwa

AU - Buang, Fhataheyah

AU - Mat Lazim, Mohamad Azwani Shah

AU - Ahmad, Naveed

AU - Martin, Claire

AU - Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The use of bacterial cellulose (BC)-based hydrogel has been gaining attention owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. This study was designed to investigate the effect of radiation doses and acrylic acid (AA) composition on in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of BC/AA as wound dressing materials. Physical properties of the hydrogel, that is, thickness, adhesiveness, rate of water vapor transmission, and swelling were measured. Moreover, the effect of these parameters on skin irritation and sensitization, blood compatibility, and cytotoxicity was studied. Increased AA content and irradiation doses increased the thickness, crosslinking density, and improved the mechanical properties of the hydrogel, but reduced its adhesiveness. The swelling capacity of the hydrogel increased significantly with a decrease in the AA composition in simulated wound fluid. The water vapor permeability of polymeric hydrogels was in the range of 2035-2666[g/(m-2day-1)]. Dermal irritation and sensitization test demonstrated that the hydrogel was nonirritant and nonallergic. The BC/AA hydrogel was found to be nontoxic to primary human dermal fibroblast skin cells with viability >88% and was found to be biocompatible with blood with a low hemolytic index (0.80-1.30%). Collectively, these results indicate that these hydrogels have the potential to be used as wound dressings.

AB - The use of bacterial cellulose (BC)-based hydrogel has been gaining attention owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. This study was designed to investigate the effect of radiation doses and acrylic acid (AA) composition on in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of BC/AA as wound dressing materials. Physical properties of the hydrogel, that is, thickness, adhesiveness, rate of water vapor transmission, and swelling were measured. Moreover, the effect of these parameters on skin irritation and sensitization, blood compatibility, and cytotoxicity was studied. Increased AA content and irradiation doses increased the thickness, crosslinking density, and improved the mechanical properties of the hydrogel, but reduced its adhesiveness. The swelling capacity of the hydrogel increased significantly with a decrease in the AA composition in simulated wound fluid. The water vapor permeability of polymeric hydrogels was in the range of 2035-2666[g/(m-2day-1)]. Dermal irritation and sensitization test demonstrated that the hydrogel was nonirritant and nonallergic. The BC/AA hydrogel was found to be nontoxic to primary human dermal fibroblast skin cells with viability >88% and was found to be biocompatible with blood with a low hemolytic index (0.80-1.30%). Collectively, these results indicate that these hydrogels have the potential to be used as wound dressings.

KW - Adhesiveness

KW - Dermal toxicity

KW - Hemocompatibility

KW - Hydrogel wound dressing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84990050211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84990050211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jbm.b.33776

DO - 10.1002/jbm.b.33776

M3 - Article

C2 - 27690276

AN - SCOPUS:84990050211

JO - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research

JF - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research

SN - 0021-9304

ER -