Cephalhematoma infected by Escherichia coli presenting as an extensive scalp abscess

Chee Sing Wong, Cheah Fook Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cephalhematoma is normally a self-limiting condition affecting 1%-2% of live births, especially following instrumental forceps delivery. The sub-periosteal bleed is characteristically limited by the cranial sutures. Although benign in most instances, this condition may, in a small proportion of cases, be complicated by hyperbilirubinemia or scalp infection. We describe a case of cephalhematoma in a newborn infant infected with Escherichia coli resulting in an extensive deep seated scalp abscess. The infection was also systemic causing E. coli septicemia and initial assessment assumed local extension including bone and meningeal to cause skull osteomyelitis and meningitis respectively. Further investigations and multiple-modality imaging with ultrasound, CT scan and bone scintigraphy outlined the involvement as limited to the scalp, resulting in a shorter antibiotic treatment period and earlier discharge from hospital. The infant recovered well with parenteral antibiotics, saucerization of the abscess and a later skin grafting procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2336-2340
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume47
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Scalp
Abscess
Escherichia coli
Cranial Sutures
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bone and Bones
Skin Transplantation
Hyperbilirubinemia
Live Birth
Osteomyelitis
Infection
Meningitis
Surgical Instruments
Skull
Radionuclide Imaging
Ultrasonography
Sepsis
Newborn Infant
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Abscess
  • Cephalhematoma
  • Escherichia coli
  • Osteomyelitis
  • Septicemia
  • Three-phase bone scintigraphy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Cephalhematoma infected by Escherichia coli presenting as an extensive scalp abscess. / Wong, Chee Sing; Fook Choe, Cheah.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 47, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 2336-2340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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