Cat's curse: A case of misdiagnosed kerion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Kerion is an inflammatory type of tinea capitis which can be mistaken for bacterial infection or folliculitis as both conditions display similar clinical features. It occurs most frequently in prepubescent children and rarely in adults. We report a 26-yearold woman who presented with multiple tender inflammed nodules on her scalp. Her condition was misdiagnosed as bacterial abscess and treated with multiple courses of antibiotics without improvement. Later, her condition was re-diagnosed as kerion based on clinical appearance, history of contact with infected animal and Wood's lamp examination. Symptoms and lesions resolved completely with systemic antifungaltreatment leaving residual scarring alopecia. The delay in the diagnosis and treatment of this patient resulted in permanent scarring alopecia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-38
Number of pages4
JournalMalaysian Family Physician
Volume7
Issue number2-3
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Alopecia
Diagnostic Errors
Cicatrix
Cats
Tinea Capitis
Folliculitis
Scalp
Bacterial Infections
Abscess
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Alopecia
  • Kerion
  • Kerion celsi
  • Tinea capitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

Cat's curse : A case of misdiagnosed kerion. / Mazlim, M. B.; Muthupalani, Leelavathi.

In: Malaysian Family Physician, Vol. 7, No. 2-3, 2012, p. 35-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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