Carbimazole-induced agranulocytosis treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF): A report of two cases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Agranulocytosis is the most serious and potentially fatal side-efiect of antithyroid drug therapy. We report two cases presenting with carbimazole-induced agranulocyotsis. The first patient received 20 mg of carbimazole daily, and developed agranulocytosis within one month of commencementoftherapy. The second patientpresented with agranulocytosis complicated by a thyroid storm following Ingestion 60 mg of carbimazole, daily for two months. Both patients were treated with 300 mg of granulocyte colony factor (GCSF) subcutaneously (in addition to discontinuation of their anti-thyroid drugs) and broadspectrum antibiotics for neutropenic sepsis. The total white and neutrophil counts returned to baseline following five and six days of treatment, respectively, with the resolution the use of GCSF in the treatment will be being discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-332
Number of pages3
JournalKuwait Medical Journal
Volume47
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Carbimazole
Agranulocytosis
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Thyroid Crisis
Antithyroid Agents
Granulocytes
Sepsis
Thyroid Gland
Neutrophils
Eating
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Agranulocytosis
  • Carbimazole
  • Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF)
  • Neutropenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Agranulocytosis is the most serious and potentially fatal side-efiect of antithyroid drug therapy. We report two cases presenting with carbimazole-induced agranulocyotsis. The first patient received 20 mg of carbimazole daily, and developed agranulocytosis within one month of commencementoftherapy. The second patientpresented with agranulocytosis complicated by a thyroid storm following Ingestion 60 mg of carbimazole, daily for two months. Both patients were treated with 300 mg of granulocyte colony factor (GCSF) subcutaneously (in addition to discontinuation of their anti-thyroid drugs) and broadspectrum antibiotics for neutropenic sepsis. The total white and neutrophil counts returned to baseline following five and six days of treatment, respectively, with the resolution the use of GCSF in the treatment will be being discussed.",
keywords = "Agranulocytosis, Carbimazole, Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), Neutropenia",
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AU - A. Wahab @ A. Rahman, Norasyikin

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AU - Zainudin, Suehazlyn

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N2 - Agranulocytosis is the most serious and potentially fatal side-efiect of antithyroid drug therapy. We report two cases presenting with carbimazole-induced agranulocyotsis. The first patient received 20 mg of carbimazole daily, and developed agranulocytosis within one month of commencementoftherapy. The second patientpresented with agranulocytosis complicated by a thyroid storm following Ingestion 60 mg of carbimazole, daily for two months. Both patients were treated with 300 mg of granulocyte colony factor (GCSF) subcutaneously (in addition to discontinuation of their anti-thyroid drugs) and broadspectrum antibiotics for neutropenic sepsis. The total white and neutrophil counts returned to baseline following five and six days of treatment, respectively, with the resolution the use of GCSF in the treatment will be being discussed.

AB - Agranulocytosis is the most serious and potentially fatal side-efiect of antithyroid drug therapy. We report two cases presenting with carbimazole-induced agranulocyotsis. The first patient received 20 mg of carbimazole daily, and developed agranulocytosis within one month of commencementoftherapy. The second patientpresented with agranulocytosis complicated by a thyroid storm following Ingestion 60 mg of carbimazole, daily for two months. Both patients were treated with 300 mg of granulocyte colony factor (GCSF) subcutaneously (in addition to discontinuation of their anti-thyroid drugs) and broadspectrum antibiotics for neutropenic sepsis. The total white and neutrophil counts returned to baseline following five and six days of treatment, respectively, with the resolution the use of GCSF in the treatment will be being discussed.

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KW - Neutropenia

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