Capacity-building in clinical skills of rehabilitation workforce in low- and middle-income countries

Fary Khan, Bhasker Amatya, Wouter De Groote, Mayowa Owolabi, Ilyas M. Syed, Abderrazak Hajjoui, Muhammad N. Babur, Tahir M. Sayed, Yvonne Frizzell, Amaramalar Selvi Naicker, Maryam Fourtassi, Alaeldin Elmalik, Mary P. Galea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Despite the prevalence of disability in low- and middle-income countries, the clinical skills of the rehabilitation workforce are not well described. We report health professionals' perspectives on clinical skills in austere settings and identify context-specific gaps in workforce capacity. Methods: A cross-sectional pilot survey (Pakistan, Morocco, Nigeria, Malaysia) of health professionals working in rehabilitation in hospital and community settings. A situational-analysis survey captured assessment of clinical skills required in various rehabilitation settings. Responses were coded in a line-byline process, and linked to categories in domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Respondents (n = 532) from Pakistan 248, Nigeria 159, Morocco 93 and Malaysia 32 included the following: physiotherapists (52.8%), nurses (8.8%), speech (5.3%) and occupational therapists (8.5%), rehabilitation physicians (3.8%), other doctors (5.5%) and prosthetist/orthotists (1.5%). The 10 commonly used clinical skills reported were prescription of: physical activity, medications, transfer-techniques, daily-living activities, patient/carer education, diagnosis/screening, behaviour/cognitive interventions, comprehensive patient-care, referrals, assessments and collaboration. There was significant overlap in skills listed irrespective of profession. Most responses linked with ICF categories in activities/participation and personal factors. Conclusion: The core skills identified reflect general rehabilitation practice and a task-shifting approach, to address shortages of health workers in low- and middle-income countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)472-479
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Capacity Building
Clinical Competence
Rehabilitation
Morocco
Malaysia
Pakistan
Nigeria
Health
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Physical Therapists
Patient Education
Activities of Daily Living
General Practice
Caregivers
Prescriptions
Patient Care
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Nurses
Exercise

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Low- and middleincome countries
  • Rehabilitation
  • Skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Khan, F., Amatya, B., De Groote, W., Owolabi, M., Syed, I. M., Hajjoui, A., ... Galea, M. P. (2018). Capacity-building in clinical skills of rehabilitation workforce in low- and middle-income countries. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 50(5), 472-479. https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2313

Capacity-building in clinical skills of rehabilitation workforce in low- and middle-income countries. / Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; De Groote, Wouter; Owolabi, Mayowa; Syed, Ilyas M.; Hajjoui, Abderrazak; Babur, Muhammad N.; Sayed, Tahir M.; Frizzell, Yvonne; Selvi Naicker, Amaramalar; Fourtassi, Maryam; Elmalik, Alaeldin; Galea, Mary P.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 5, 01.01.2018, p. 472-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, F, Amatya, B, De Groote, W, Owolabi, M, Syed, IM, Hajjoui, A, Babur, MN, Sayed, TM, Frizzell, Y, Selvi Naicker, A, Fourtassi, M, Elmalik, A & Galea, MP 2018, 'Capacity-building in clinical skills of rehabilitation workforce in low- and middle-income countries', Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 472-479. https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2313
Khan, Fary ; Amatya, Bhasker ; De Groote, Wouter ; Owolabi, Mayowa ; Syed, Ilyas M. ; Hajjoui, Abderrazak ; Babur, Muhammad N. ; Sayed, Tahir M. ; Frizzell, Yvonne ; Selvi Naicker, Amaramalar ; Fourtassi, Maryam ; Elmalik, Alaeldin ; Galea, Mary P. / Capacity-building in clinical skills of rehabilitation workforce in low- and middle-income countries. In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 50, No. 5. pp. 472-479.
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