Can the use of 70% isopropyl alcohol swab or aspiration using 5 μm Filter Straw® reduce bacterial contamination of fentanyl solution used for regional anaesthesia?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This prospective study aimed to determine the extent of contamination of fentanyl solutions used for central neuraxial injection by wiping the neck of the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs (Kendall®) before breaking open the ampoules and aspiration of fentanyl solutions using a 5 μm Filter Straw® (B. Braun). In Group A, fifty fentanyl ampoules were wiped with 70% isopropyl alcohol swab prior to opening and the contents were aspirated immediately using a 21G needle and a 5 μm filter straw for culture. The same steps were repeated on the remaining solutions after two hours. In Group B, all the above steps were repeated but without wiping the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs. None of the samples from the wiped ampoules or aspiration using filter straw grew microorganisms. Six percent of the samples from unwiped group grew microorganisms when fentanyl were aspirated using a 21G needle and the contamination increased to 16% when repeated after two hours. Wiping the outsides of the fentanyl ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs before opening or aspirating the contents using a 5 μm filter straw has been shown to be equally effective in avoiding bacterial contamination and should be practiced routinely when performing regional anaesthesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-94
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume66
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Conduction Anesthesia
2-Propanol
Fentanyl
Needles
Neck
Prospective Studies
Injections

Keywords

  • Contamination
  • Fentanyl solution
  • Filter straw
  • Isopropyl alcohol swab
  • Regional anaesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7259970f7735412d9bcb8b69f350772f,
title = "Can the use of 70{\%} isopropyl alcohol swab or aspiration using 5 μm Filter Straw{\circledR} reduce bacterial contamination of fentanyl solution used for regional anaesthesia?",
abstract = "This prospective study aimed to determine the extent of contamination of fentanyl solutions used for central neuraxial injection by wiping the neck of the ampoules with 70{\%} isopropyl alcohol swabs (Kendall{\circledR}) before breaking open the ampoules and aspiration of fentanyl solutions using a 5 μm Filter Straw{\circledR} (B. Braun). In Group A, fifty fentanyl ampoules were wiped with 70{\%} isopropyl alcohol swab prior to opening and the contents were aspirated immediately using a 21G needle and a 5 μm filter straw for culture. The same steps were repeated on the remaining solutions after two hours. In Group B, all the above steps were repeated but without wiping the ampoules with 70{\%} isopropyl alcohol swabs. None of the samples from the wiped ampoules or aspiration using filter straw grew microorganisms. Six percent of the samples from unwiped group grew microorganisms when fentanyl were aspirated using a 21G needle and the contamination increased to 16{\%} when repeated after two hours. Wiping the outsides of the fentanyl ampoules with 70{\%} isopropyl alcohol swabs before opening or aspirating the contents using a 5 μm filter straw has been shown to be equally effective in avoiding bacterial contamination and should be practiced routinely when performing regional anaesthesia.",
keywords = "Contamination, Fentanyl solution, Filter straw, Isopropyl alcohol swab, Regional anaesthesia",
author = "Roshaliza, {H. M.} and Liu, {Chian Yong} and {Su Min}, {Ooi Joanna}",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "92--94",
journal = "Medical Journal of Malaysia",
issn = "0300-5283",
publisher = "Malaysian Medical Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can the use of 70% isopropyl alcohol swab or aspiration using 5 μm Filter Straw® reduce bacterial contamination of fentanyl solution used for regional anaesthesia?

AU - Roshaliza, H. M.

AU - Liu, Chian Yong

AU - Su Min, Ooi Joanna

PY - 2011/6

Y1 - 2011/6

N2 - This prospective study aimed to determine the extent of contamination of fentanyl solutions used for central neuraxial injection by wiping the neck of the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs (Kendall®) before breaking open the ampoules and aspiration of fentanyl solutions using a 5 μm Filter Straw® (B. Braun). In Group A, fifty fentanyl ampoules were wiped with 70% isopropyl alcohol swab prior to opening and the contents were aspirated immediately using a 21G needle and a 5 μm filter straw for culture. The same steps were repeated on the remaining solutions after two hours. In Group B, all the above steps were repeated but without wiping the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs. None of the samples from the wiped ampoules or aspiration using filter straw grew microorganisms. Six percent of the samples from unwiped group grew microorganisms when fentanyl were aspirated using a 21G needle and the contamination increased to 16% when repeated after two hours. Wiping the outsides of the fentanyl ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs before opening or aspirating the contents using a 5 μm filter straw has been shown to be equally effective in avoiding bacterial contamination and should be practiced routinely when performing regional anaesthesia.

AB - This prospective study aimed to determine the extent of contamination of fentanyl solutions used for central neuraxial injection by wiping the neck of the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs (Kendall®) before breaking open the ampoules and aspiration of fentanyl solutions using a 5 μm Filter Straw® (B. Braun). In Group A, fifty fentanyl ampoules were wiped with 70% isopropyl alcohol swab prior to opening and the contents were aspirated immediately using a 21G needle and a 5 μm filter straw for culture. The same steps were repeated on the remaining solutions after two hours. In Group B, all the above steps were repeated but without wiping the ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs. None of the samples from the wiped ampoules or aspiration using filter straw grew microorganisms. Six percent of the samples from unwiped group grew microorganisms when fentanyl were aspirated using a 21G needle and the contamination increased to 16% when repeated after two hours. Wiping the outsides of the fentanyl ampoules with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs before opening or aspirating the contents using a 5 μm filter straw has been shown to be equally effective in avoiding bacterial contamination and should be practiced routinely when performing regional anaesthesia.

KW - Contamination

KW - Fentanyl solution

KW - Filter straw

KW - Isopropyl alcohol swab

KW - Regional anaesthesia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79961000859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79961000859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 22106684

AN - SCOPUS:79961000859

VL - 66

SP - 92

EP - 94

JO - Medical Journal of Malaysia

JF - Medical Journal of Malaysia

SN - 0300-5283

IS - 2

ER -