Breakfast eating pattern and ready-to-eat cereals consumption among schoolchildren in Kuala Lumpur

Hui Chin Koo, Siti Nurain Abdul Jalil, Ruzita Abd. Talib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Studies from the West have demonstrated that ready-to-eat cereals (RTECs) are a common form of breakfast and more likely to be consumed by children. This study aimed to investigate the breakfast eating pattern and RTECs consumption among schoolchildren in Kuala Lumpur. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 382 schoolchildren, aged 10 and 11 years old, were recruited from seven randomly selected primary schools in Kuala Lumpur. Information on socio-demographics, breakfast eating patterns, and perceptions of RTECs and dietary intake (24-hour dietary recalls) were obtained. Results: Among the respondents, only 22% of them consumed breakfast on a regular basis. The most commonly eaten food by children at breakfast was bread (27.2%), followed by biscuits (22.2%) and RTECs (20.5%). The majority of them (93%) reported that they consumed RTECs sometimes during the week. Chocolate RTECs (34.1%), corn flake RTECs (30.3%), and RTECs coated with honey (25.1%) were the most popular RTECs chosen by children. Respondents who consumed RTECs showed a significantly higher intake in calories, carbohydrate, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B3, folate, vitamin C, calcium, iron, and fibre (P < 0.05), compared to those who skipped breakfast and those who had breakfast foods other than RTECs. Conclusion: The lower levels of breakfast consumption among schoolchildren in Kuala Lumpur need serious attention. RTEC is a nutritious food which is well accepted by a majority of the schoolchildren in Kuala Lumpur. Nutrition intervention should be conducted in the future to include a well-balanced breakfast with the utilisation of RTECs for schoolchildren.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-39
Number of pages8
JournalMalaysian Journal of Medical Sciences
Volume22
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Breakfast
Eating
Food
Edible Grain
Niacinamide
Honey
Riboflavin
Thiamine
Bread
Vitamin A
Folic Acid
Ascorbic Acid
Zea mays
Iron
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Breakfast
  • Calorie
  • Cereals
  • Children
  • Malaysia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Breakfast eating pattern and ready-to-eat cereals consumption among schoolchildren in Kuala Lumpur. / Koo, Hui Chin; Jalil, Siti Nurain Abdul; Abd. Talib, Ruzita.

In: Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 1, 2015, p. 32-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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