Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)

On Behalf Of The Seanuts Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study aimed to (i) calculate body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values for children aged 0·5–12 years participating in the South-East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS); (ii) investigate whether the pooled (i.e. including all countries) SEANUTS weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values can be used for all SEANUTS countries instead of country-specific ones; and (iii) examine whether the pooled SEANUTS percentile values differ from the WHO growth references. Design: Body weight and length/height were measured. The LMS method was used for calculating smoothened body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values. The standardized site effect (SSE) values were used for identifying large differences (i.e. (Formula presented.)>0·5) between the pooled SEANUTS sample and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples after excluding one single country each time, as well as with WHO growth references. Setting: Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia. Subjects: Data from 14 202 eligible children. Results: The SSE derived from the comparisons of the percentile values between the pooled and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples were indicative of small/acceptable (i.e. (Formula presented.)≤0·5) differences. In contrast, the comparisons of the pooled SEANUTS sample with WHO revealed large differences in certain percentiles. Conclusions: The findings of the present study support the use of percentile values derived from the pooled SEANUTS sample for evaluating the weight status of children in each SEANUTS country. Nevertheless, large differences were observed in certain percentiles values when SEANUTS and WHO reference values were compared.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Indonesia
Vietnam
Malaysia
Thailand
Growth
Reference Values

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Children
  • Nutrition
  • Percentiles
  • SEANUTS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS). / On Behalf Of The Seanuts Study Group.

In: Public Health Nutrition, 01.06.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The present study aimed to (i) calculate body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values for children aged 0·5–12 years participating in the South-East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS); (ii) investigate whether the pooled (i.e. including all countries) SEANUTS weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values can be used for all SEANUTS countries instead of country-specific ones; and (iii) examine whether the pooled SEANUTS percentile values differ from the WHO growth references. Design: Body weight and length/height were measured. The LMS method was used for calculating smoothened body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values. The standardized site effect (SSE) values were used for identifying large differences (i.e. (Formula presented.)>0·5) between the pooled SEANUTS sample and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples after excluding one single country each time, as well as with WHO growth references. Setting: Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia. Subjects: Data from 14 202 eligible children. Results: The SSE derived from the comparisons of the percentile values between the pooled and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples were indicative of small/acceptable (i.e. (Formula presented.)≤0·5) differences. In contrast, the comparisons of the pooled SEANUTS sample with WHO revealed large differences in certain percentiles. Conclusions: The findings of the present study support the use of percentile values derived from the pooled SEANUTS sample for evaluating the weight status of children in each SEANUTS country. Nevertheless, large differences were observed in certain percentiles values when SEANUTS and WHO reference values were compared.",
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author = "{On Behalf Of The Seanuts Study Group} and Sandjaja Sandjaja and Poh, {Bee Koon} and Nipa Rojroongwasinkul and {Le Nguyen Bao}, Khanh and Moesijanti Soekatri and Wong, {Jyh Eiin} and Atitada Boonpraderm and Huu, {Chinh Nguyen} and Paul Deurenberg and Yannis Manios",
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AU - On Behalf Of The Seanuts Study Group

AU - Sandjaja, Sandjaja

AU - Poh, Bee Koon

AU - Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa

AU - Le Nguyen Bao, Khanh

AU - Soekatri, Moesijanti

AU - Wong, Jyh Eiin

AU - Boonpraderm, Atitada

AU - Huu, Chinh Nguyen

AU - Deurenberg, Paul

AU - Manios, Yannis

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