Bitten by the "flying" tree snake, Chrysopelea paradisi

Toh Leong Tan, Ahmad Khaldun Ismail, Kien Woo Kong, Nor Khatijah Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The paradise tree snake, Chrysopelea paradisi, is a rear-fanged colubrid. Like other members of the genus Chrysopelea, it is able to glide through the air, and thus, is commonly known as a "flying snake." There are few documented effects of its bite on humans. Case Report: A 16-year-old military college student presented to the Emergency Department (ED) of an urban teaching hospital 2 h after being bitten by C. paradisi. There were multiple bite marks and the patient reported moderate pain on the left index finger. There was no evidence of significant local or systemic envenomation. A transient prolonged coagulation profile and raised creatine kinase level were noted. Conclusion: The full effects of a bite from C. paradisi remain uncharacterized. This case featured only mild local effect. After the administration of first aid, non-sedating analgesia, anti-tetanus toxoid injection, and broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage, a short stay in the ED observation ward with regular monitoring of vital signs and serial wound inspection are recommended. More effort is required to increase awareness of the prevention and management of snakebite with equal emphasis on conservation of wildlife and their natural habitat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)420-423
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Snakes
Bites and Stings
Hospital Emergency Service
Human Bites
Snake Bites
First Aid
Tetanus Toxoid
Vital Signs
Urban Hospitals
Creatine Kinase
Teaching Hospitals
Analgesia
Fingers
Ecosystem
Air
Observation
Students
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pain
Injections

Keywords

  • Chrysopelea
  • colubridae
  • envenomation
  • flying snake
  • snake bite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Bitten by the "flying" tree snake, Chrysopelea paradisi. / Tan, Toh Leong; Ismail, Ahmad Khaldun; Kong, Kien Woo; Ahmad, Nor Khatijah.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 420-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tan, Toh Leong ; Ismail, Ahmad Khaldun ; Kong, Kien Woo ; Ahmad, Nor Khatijah. / Bitten by the "flying" tree snake, Chrysopelea paradisi. In: Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 420-423.
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