Biotribology inspires new technologies

Ille C. Gebeshuber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review deals with natural biotribological systems and how they have inspired novel micro- and nanotechnological applications. The biogenic devices presented here have functional units in the micro- and nanometer regime and have been evolutionarily optimized over millions of years. The examples discussed comprise natural micromechanical systems made of nanostructured silica (diatoms produce hinges and interlocking devices on the micrometer scale and below), adhesive molecules (selectin and integrin) that can switch states and account for white blood cell rolling in endothelial cells, dry adhesives as they occur on the Gecko foot and certain insect attachment pads, and single molecules that serve as strong self-healing adhesives (diatom underwater adhesives, abalone shell proteins).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-37
Number of pages8
JournalNano Today
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adhesives
Technology
Diatoms
Selectins
Equipment and Supplies
Molecules
Lizards
Endothelial cells
Hinges
Integrins
Silicon Dioxide
Insects
Foot
Leukocytes
Blood
Endothelial Cells
Silica
Cells
Switches
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Biotribology inspires new technologies. / Gebeshuber, Ille C.

In: Nano Today, Vol. 2, No. 5, 10.2007, p. 30-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gebeshuber, Ille C. / Biotribology inspires new technologies. In: Nano Today. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 30-37.
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