Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments

Teresa Makarczuk, Tina R. Matin, Salmah B. Karman, S. Zaleha M Diah, Benyamin Davaji, Mark O. MacQueen, Jeanette Mueller, Ulrich Schmid, Ille C. Gebeshuber

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The human senses are of extraordinary value but we cannot change them even if this proves to be a disadvantage in modern times. However, we can assist, enhance and expand these senses via MEMS. Current MEMS cover the range of the human sensory system, and additionally provide data about signals that are too weak for the human sensory system (in terms of signal strength) and signal types that are not covered by the human sensory system. Biomimetics deals with knowledge transfer from biology to technology. In our interdisciplinary approach existing MEMS sensor designs shall be modified and adapted (to keep costs at bay), via biomimetic knowledge transfer of outstanding sensory perception in 'best practice' organisms (e.g. thermoreception, UV sensing, electromagnetic sense). The MEMS shall then be linked to the human body (mainly ex corpore to avoid ethics conflicts), to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perception. This paper gives an overview of senses in humans and animals, respective MEMS sensors that are already on the market and gives a list of possible applications of such devices including sensors that vibrate when a blind person approaches a kerb stone edge and devices that allow divers better orientation under water (echolocation, ultrasound).

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
    Volume8066
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    EventSmart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS V - Prague
    Duration: 18 Apr 201120 Apr 2011

    Other

    OtherSmart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS V
    CityPrague
    Period18/4/1120/4/11

    Fingerprint

    biomimetics
    Biomimetics
    Micro-electro-mechanical Systems
    Expand
    microelectromechanical systems
    MEMS
    Knowledge Transfer
    Sensors
    sensors
    Sensor
    ethics
    Vibrate
    human body
    biology
    organisms
    Animals
    Best Practice
    lists
    Ultrasonics
    Ultrasound

    Keywords

    • Bioinspired
    • Biomimetics
    • Biomimicry
    • MEMS
    • Senses
    • Sensory systems

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Mathematics
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
    • Condensed Matter Physics

    Cite this

    Makarczuk, T., Matin, T. R., Karman, S. B., Diah, S. Z. M., Davaji, B., MacQueen, M. O., ... Gebeshuber, I. C. (2011). Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 8066). [80661O] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.886554

    Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments. / Makarczuk, Teresa; Matin, Tina R.; Karman, Salmah B.; Diah, S. Zaleha M; Davaji, Benyamin; MacQueen, Mark O.; Mueller, Jeanette; Schmid, Ulrich; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8066 2011. 80661O.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Makarczuk, T, Matin, TR, Karman, SB, Diah, SZM, Davaji, B, MacQueen, MO, Mueller, J, Schmid, U & Gebeshuber, IC 2011, Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 8066, 80661O, Smart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS V, Prague, 18/4/11. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.886554
    Makarczuk T, Matin TR, Karman SB, Diah SZM, Davaji B, MacQueen MO et al. Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8066. 2011. 80661O https://doi.org/10.1117/12.886554
    Makarczuk, Teresa ; Matin, Tina R. ; Karman, Salmah B. ; Diah, S. Zaleha M ; Davaji, Benyamin ; MacQueen, Mark O. ; Mueller, Jeanette ; Schmid, Ulrich ; Gebeshuber, Ille C. / Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perceptions - A survey on state-of-the art developments. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8066 2011.
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