Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection

Oliver Futterknecht, Mark O. Macqueen, Salmah Karman, S. Zaleha M Diah, Ille C. Gebeshuber

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The focus of this study is biomimetic concept development for a MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. The MEMS sensor array is inspired by abstractions of the respective biological functions: polarized skylight-based navigation sensors in honeybees (Apis mellifera) and the ability of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) to detect water. The focus lies on how to navigate to and how to detect water sources in desert-like or remote areas. The goal is to develop a sensor that can provide both, navigation clues and help in detecting nearby water sources. We basically use the information provided by the natural polarization pattern produced by the sunbeams scattered within the atmosphere combined with the capability of the honeybee's compound eye to extrapolate the navigation information. The detection device uses light beam reactive MEMS, which are capable to detect the skylight polarization based on the Rayleigh sky model. For water detection we present various possible approaches to realize the sensor. In the first approach, polarization is used: moisture saturated areas near ground have a small but distinctively different effect on scattering and polarizing light than less moist ones. Modified skylight polarization sensors (Karman, Diah and Gebeshuber, 2012) are used to visualize this small change in scattering. The second approach is inspired by the ability of elephants to detect infrasound produced by underground water reservoirs, and shall be used to determine the location of underground rivers and visualize their exact routes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
    Volume8763
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventConference Smart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS VI - Grenoble
    Duration: 24 Apr 201326 Apr 2013

    Other

    OtherConference Smart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS VI
    CityGrenoble
    Period24/4/1326/4/13

    Fingerprint

    Sensor Array
    biomimetics
    Sensor arrays
    Biomimetics
    Micro-electro-mechanical Systems
    navigation
    microelectromechanical systems
    MEMS
    Navigation
    Water
    sensors
    Polarization
    water
    Sensors
    Sensor
    polarization
    Scattering
    Extrapolate
    deserts
    Moisture

    Keywords

    • Biomimetics
    • MEMS
    • Navigation
    • Polarization
    • Sensory system
    • Water detection

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Mathematics
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
    • Condensed Matter Physics

    Cite this

    Futterknecht, O., Macqueen, M. O., Karman, S., Diah, S. Z. M., & Gebeshuber, I. C. (2013). Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 8763). [87632B] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016953

    Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. / Futterknecht, Oliver; Macqueen, Mark O.; Karman, Salmah; Diah, S. Zaleha M; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8763 2013. 87632B.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Futterknecht, O, Macqueen, MO, Karman, S, Diah, SZM & Gebeshuber, IC 2013, Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 8763, 87632B, Conference Smart Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS VI, Grenoble, 24/4/13. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016953
    Futterknecht O, Macqueen MO, Karman S, Diah SZM, Gebeshuber IC. Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8763. 2013. 87632B https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016953
    Futterknecht, Oliver ; Macqueen, Mark O. ; Karman, Salmah ; Diah, S. Zaleha M ; Gebeshuber, Ille C. / Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8763 2013.
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