Bio-inspired polarized skylight-based navigation sensors: A review

Salmah B. Karman, S. Zaleha M Diah, Ille C. Gebeshuber

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Animal senses cover a broad range of signal types and signal bandwidths and have inspired various sensors and bioinstrumentation devices for biological and medical applications. Insects, such as desert ants and honeybees, for example, utilize polarized skylight pattern-based information in their navigation activities. They reliably return to their nests and hives from places many kilometers away. The insect navigation system involves the dorsal rim area in their compound eyes and the corresponding polarization sensitive neurons in the brain. The dorsal rim area is equipped with photoreceptors, which have orthogonally arranged small hair-like structures termed microvilli. These are the specialized sensors for the detection of polarized skylight patterns (e-vector orientation). Various research groups have been working on the development of novel navigation systems inspired by polarized skylight-based navigation in animals. Their major contributions are critically reviewed. One focus of current research activities is on imitating the integration path mechanism in desert ants. The potential for simple, high performance miniaturized bioinstrumentation that can assist people in navigation will be explored.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)14232-14261
    Number of pages30
    JournalSensors (Switzerland)
    Volume12
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

    Fingerprint

    Ants
    navigation
    Insects
    Navigation
    Navigation systems
    Biosensors
    sensors
    Urticaria
    Sensors
    Animals
    Microvilli
    Research
    insects
    deserts
    rims
    bioinstrumentation
    Medical applications
    animals
    Neurons
    Equipment and Supplies

    Keywords

    • Bio-inspired
    • Bioinstrumentation
    • Polarized skylight navigation sensor

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
    • Analytical Chemistry
    • Biochemistry

    Cite this

    Karman, S. B., Diah, S. Z. M., & Gebeshuber, I. C. (2012). Bio-inspired polarized skylight-based navigation sensors: A review. Sensors (Switzerland), 12(11), 14232-14261. https://doi.org/10.3390/s121114232

    Bio-inspired polarized skylight-based navigation sensors : A review. / Karman, Salmah B.; Diah, S. Zaleha M; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    In: Sensors (Switzerland), Vol. 12, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 14232-14261.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Karman, SB, Diah, SZM & Gebeshuber, IC 2012, 'Bio-inspired polarized skylight-based navigation sensors: A review', Sensors (Switzerland), vol. 12, no. 11, pp. 14232-14261. https://doi.org/10.3390/s121114232
    Karman, Salmah B. ; Diah, S. Zaleha M ; Gebeshuber, Ille C. / Bio-inspired polarized skylight-based navigation sensors : A review. In: Sensors (Switzerland). 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 11. pp. 14232-14261.
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