Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children

A. Zulfiqar, A. H. Rozalina, Syed Zulkifli Syed Zakaria, M. N. Mahmood

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Objective: To determine the success rate of balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. Materials and methods: Over a period of 5 years, 24 children aged between 1 month and 10 years 10 months had balloon dilatation. The causes of esophageal stricture included anastomotic stricture (17), corrosive ingestion (5), achalasia (1) and Barret's esophagitis (1). An angioplasty catheter with a 6 mm or 8 mm diameter balloon was used for infants. An esophageal balloon catheter with a 10 mm or 15 mm diameter balloon was used for older children. Treatment was considered successful when there was a clinically asymptomatic period of at least 1 year at the time of this review. Results: There was a 63% success rate. The cases that were successfully treated with balloon dilatation were children with anastomotic stricture. Results were poor for corrosive stricture and failed totally for achalasia and Barret's esophagitis. There were no complications during the procedure. Conclusion: Balloon dilatation is an effective and safe method of treatment of esophageal stricture in children. It is most effective for anastomotic stricture. Stricture recurrence is common and multiple dilatations are usually required.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAsian Oceanian Journal of Radiology
Pages19-22
Number of pages4
Volume5
Edition1
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Esophageal Stenosis
Dilatation
Pathologic Constriction
Caustics
Esophageal Achalasia
Esophagitis
Catheters
Angioplasty
Eating
Recurrence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Balloon dilatation
  • Children
  • Esophageal stricture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Zulfiqar, A., Rozalina, A. H., Syed Zakaria, S. Z., & Mahmood, M. N. (2000). Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. In Asian Oceanian Journal of Radiology (1 ed., Vol. 5, pp. 19-22)

Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. / Zulfiqar, A.; Rozalina, A. H.; Syed Zakaria, Syed Zulkifli; Mahmood, M. N.

Asian Oceanian Journal of Radiology. Vol. 5 1. ed. 2000. p. 19-22.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Zulfiqar, A, Rozalina, AH, Syed Zakaria, SZ & Mahmood, MN 2000, Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. in Asian Oceanian Journal of Radiology. 1 edn, vol. 5, pp. 19-22.
Zulfiqar A, Rozalina AH, Syed Zakaria SZ, Mahmood MN. Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. In Asian Oceanian Journal of Radiology. 1 ed. Vol. 5. 2000. p. 19-22
Zulfiqar, A. ; Rozalina, A. H. ; Syed Zakaria, Syed Zulkifli ; Mahmood, M. N. / Balloon dilatation of esophageal stricture in children. Asian Oceanian Journal of Radiology. Vol. 5 1. ed. 2000. pp. 19-22
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