Austenite formation of steel-3401 subjected to rapid cooling process

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel is still commonly used for railroad components such as frogs and crossings and also for rock-handling materials. This material contains approximately 1.2% carbon and 12 to 14% Mn. This paper presents the microstructural development of the austenitic manganese steel-3401 due to different heating regimes followed by rapid cooling process. The material is heated to 1050°C followed by a rapid cooling process which caused the solid solution of the carbides to be precipitated in the grain of the pure austenite phase. The tempering temperature is set between 400°C to 550°C at 50° C interval. The microstructural examination of the samples showed that the formation of austenite begins by precipitation of iron and manganese carbides at the grain boundaries, progressively followed by the appearance of a new constituent which later extended to the interior of the grains. The new phase formation increased with increasing temperature, showing temperature dependence of formation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-153
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Volume2
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Steel
Manganese
Austenite
Cooling
Carbides
Crossings (pipe and cable)
Railroads
Materials handling
Tempering
Temperature
Solid solutions
Grain boundaries
Carbon
Iron
Rocks
Heating

Keywords

  • Austenitic manganese steel-3401
  • Microstructural mapping
  • Rapid cooling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

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title = "Austenite formation of steel-3401 subjected to rapid cooling process",
abstract = "Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel is still commonly used for railroad components such as frogs and crossings and also for rock-handling materials. This material contains approximately 1.2{\%} carbon and 12 to 14{\%} Mn. This paper presents the microstructural development of the austenitic manganese steel-3401 due to different heating regimes followed by rapid cooling process. The material is heated to 1050°C followed by a rapid cooling process which caused the solid solution of the carbides to be precipitated in the grain of the pure austenite phase. The tempering temperature is set between 400°C to 550°C at 50° C interval. The microstructural examination of the samples showed that the formation of austenite begins by precipitation of iron and manganese carbides at the grain boundaries, progressively followed by the appearance of a new constituent which later extended to the interior of the grains. The new phase formation increased with increasing temperature, showing temperature dependence of formation.",
keywords = "Austenitic manganese steel-3401, Microstructural mapping, Rapid cooling",
author = "R. Fadhila and {A Ghani}, Jaharah and Omar, {Mohd. Zaidi} and {Che Haron}, {Che Hassan} and Ghazali, {Mariyam Jameelah} and A. Manaf and Azhari, {Che Husna}",
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T1 - Austenite formation of steel-3401 subjected to rapid cooling process

AU - Fadhila, R.

AU - A Ghani, Jaharah

AU - Omar, Mohd. Zaidi

AU - Che Haron, Che Hassan

AU - Ghazali, Mariyam Jameelah

AU - Manaf, A.

AU - Azhari, Che Husna

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel is still commonly used for railroad components such as frogs and crossings and also for rock-handling materials. This material contains approximately 1.2% carbon and 12 to 14% Mn. This paper presents the microstructural development of the austenitic manganese steel-3401 due to different heating regimes followed by rapid cooling process. The material is heated to 1050°C followed by a rapid cooling process which caused the solid solution of the carbides to be precipitated in the grain of the pure austenite phase. The tempering temperature is set between 400°C to 550°C at 50° C interval. The microstructural examination of the samples showed that the formation of austenite begins by precipitation of iron and manganese carbides at the grain boundaries, progressively followed by the appearance of a new constituent which later extended to the interior of the grains. The new phase formation increased with increasing temperature, showing temperature dependence of formation.

AB - Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel is still commonly used for railroad components such as frogs and crossings and also for rock-handling materials. This material contains approximately 1.2% carbon and 12 to 14% Mn. This paper presents the microstructural development of the austenitic manganese steel-3401 due to different heating regimes followed by rapid cooling process. The material is heated to 1050°C followed by a rapid cooling process which caused the solid solution of the carbides to be precipitated in the grain of the pure austenite phase. The tempering temperature is set between 400°C to 550°C at 50° C interval. The microstructural examination of the samples showed that the formation of austenite begins by precipitation of iron and manganese carbides at the grain boundaries, progressively followed by the appearance of a new constituent which later extended to the interior of the grains. The new phase formation increased with increasing temperature, showing temperature dependence of formation.

KW - Austenitic manganese steel-3401

KW - Microstructural mapping

KW - Rapid cooling

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