Attitudes Toward Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Genetic Disorders Among Potential Users in Malaysia

Angelina Patrick Olesen, Siti Nurani Mohd Nor, Latifah Amin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is available and legal in Malaysia, there is an ongoing controversy debate about its use. There are few studies available on individuals’ attitudes toward PGD, particularly among those who have a genetic disease, or whose children have a genetic disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is, in fact, the first study of its kind in Malaysia. We conducted in-depth interviews, using semi-structured questionnaires, with seven selected potential PGD users regarding their knowledge, attitudes and decisions relating to the use PGD. The criteria for selecting potential PGD users were that they or their children had a genetic disease, and they desired to have another child who would be free of genetic disease. All participants had heard of PGD and five of them were considering its use. The participants’ attitudes toward PGD were based on several different considerations that were influenced by various factors. These included: the benefit-risk balance of PGD, personal experiences of having a genetic disease, religious beliefs, personal values and cost. The study’s findings suggest that the selected Malaysian participants, as potential PGD users, were supportive but cautious regarding the use of PGD for medical purposes, particularly in relation to others whose experiences were similar. More broadly, the paper highlights the link between the participants’ personal experiences and their beliefs regarding the appropriateness, for others, of individual decision-making on PGD, which has not been revealed by previous studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-146
Number of pages14
JournalScience and Engineering Ethics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Inborn Genetic Diseases
Malaysia
Disease
Implantation
Medical Genetics
Religion
experience
Decision Making
Decision making
Interviews

Keywords

  • Malaysia
  • Personal experiences
  • Playing God
  • Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)
  • Reproductive rights

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Attitudes Toward Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Genetic Disorders Among Potential Users in Malaysia. / Olesen, Angelina Patrick; Nor, Siti Nurani Mohd; Amin, Latifah.

In: Science and Engineering Ethics, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 133-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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