Attitudes toward concordance and self-efficacy in decision making: A cross-sectional study on pharmacist–patient consultations

Yew Keong Ng, Noraida Mohamed Shah, Ly Sia Loong, Lay Ting Pee, Sarina Anim M. Hidzir, Wei Wen Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated patients’ and pharmacists’ attitudes toward concordance in a pharmacist–patient consultation and how patients’ attitudes toward concordance relate to their involvement and self-efficacy in decision making associated with medication use. Subjects and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with chronic diseases and pharmacists from three public hospitals in Malaysia. The Revised United States Leeds Attitudes toward Concordance (RUS-LATCon) was used to measure attitudes toward concordance in both patients and pharmacists. Patients also rated their perceived level of involvement in decision making and completed the Decision Self-Efficacy scale. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and independent t-test were used to determine significant differences between different subgroups on attitudes toward concordance, and multiple linear regression was performed to find the predictors of patients’ self-efficacy in decision making. Results: A total of 389 patients and 93 pharmacists participated in the study. Pharmacists and patients scored M=3.92 (SD=0.37) and M=3.84 (SD=0.46) on the RUS-LATCon scale, respectively. Seven items were found to be significantly different between pharmacists and patients on the subscale level. Patients who felt fully involved in decision making (M=3.94, SD=0.462) scored significantly higher on attitudes toward concordance than those who felt partially involved (M=3.82, SD=0.478) and not involved at all (M=3.68, SD=0.471; p<0.001). Patients had an average score of 76.7% (SD=14.73%) on the Decision Self-Efficacy scale. In multiple linear regression analysis, ethnicity, number of medications taken by patients, patients’ perceived level of involvement, and attitudes toward concordance are significant predictors of patients’ self-efficacy in decision making (p<0.05). Conclusion: Patients who felt involved in their consultations had more positive attitudes toward concordance and higher confidence in making an informed decision. Further study is recommended on interventions involving pharmacists in supporting patients’ involvement in medication-related decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-624
Number of pages10
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
cross-sectional study
self-efficacy
pharmacist
Decision Making
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
decision making
Pharmacists
medication
Linear Models
analysis of variance
Malaysia
regression analysis
Patient Participation
ethnicity
confidence
Public Hospitals
Disease
regression

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • LATCon
  • Patient involvement
  • Patient-centered care
  • Shared decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Attitudes toward concordance and self-efficacy in decision making : A cross-sectional study on pharmacist–patient consultations. / Ng, Yew Keong; Mohamed Shah, Noraida; Loong, Ly Sia; Pee, Lay Ting; Hidzir, Sarina Anim M.; Chong, Wei Wen.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 12, 24.04.2018, p. 615-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hidzir, Sarina Anim M.

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