Atmospheric surfactants around lake ecosystems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lake ecosystems are a source of natural organic matter characterized by humic-like substances (HULIS). These are believed to contain a high quantity of surface active agents (surfactants) which can influence both cloud formation and climate. This study determined the concentration of anionic surfactants in the atmosphere around lake ecosystems at Kenyir Lake, Terengganu and Chini Lake, Pahang. Aerosols samples were collected using a High Volume Air Sampler (HVAS) equipped with a high volume impactor (to separate between fine and coarse mode aerosols) and glass-fibre filter paper at a flow rate of 1.13 m3min-1 for 24 hours. Several possible sources of natural surfactants in the atmosphere, e.g. soils, vegetations and surface water, were also collected in order to determine them as sources and to determine the flux of anionic surfactants in the atmosphere. Anionic surfactants were analysed based on the colorimetric methods whereby methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and a UV-visible spectrophotometer at 650 nm were used. Subsequently, simplified calculations were conducted to estimate the flux of anionic surfactants from various possible sources. The results indicated that the concentration of anionic surfactants in aerosols (coarse and fine mode), soil, vegetation and surface water were 97.43 ± 50.39 pmol/m3 and 110.78 ± 60.92 pmol/m3, 0.33 ± 0.17 μmolg-1, 0.28 ± 0.08 μmolg-1 (dry weight) and 0.01 ± 0.004 μmolL-1, respectively. The overall flux of surfactants signified that soil provides the highest quantity of surfactants, 119.39 Mmolyr-1, in comparison to other possible sources (vegetation=26.88 Mmolyr-1 and surface water = 12.1 x 10-6 Mmolyr-1). Results indicated that soil becomes a significant natural source of anionic surfactants for the atmosphere, which may be due to the availability of HULIS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-276
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Scientific Research
Volume32
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

lake ecosystem
Lakes
Ecosystem
Surface-Active Agents
surfactants
Ecosystems
Surface active agents
lakes
ecosystems
Atmosphere
Soil
aerosols
Aerosols
Surface waters
Soils
Humic Substances
surface water
Aerosol
Vegetation
atmosphere

Keywords

  • Anionic surfactants
  • Flux of anionic surfactants
  • HULIS
  • Lake ecosystems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Atmospheric surfactants around lake ecosystems. / Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd; Latif, Mohd Talib; Mohd. Ali, Masni; Othman, Mohamed Rozali.

In: European Journal of Scientific Research, Vol. 32, No. 3, 2009, p. 268-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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