Associations between falls and psychosocial factors, self-rated health, disability and sleep among community dwelling older people in Malaysia

Shariff Ghazali Sazlina, Yoke Mun Chan, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Suzana Shahar, Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Objective: Falls among older people leads to major consequences, which affects their quality of life. The causes are multifactorial, a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which include psychosocial and functional factors. This study aimed to determine the association between falls and the psychosocial factors, self-rated health, disability and sleep among community dwelling older people in Malaysia. Methods: This study utilized the first wave data from the Towards Useful Ageing (TUA) cohort. A total of 1993 adults aged ≥60 years with no diagnosed psychiatric illness; without and with mild or moderate cognitive impairment were included in the analyses. Risk of falls, psychosocial factors (perceived stress, life satisfaction, loneliness, depression, social support, and sleep duration) and functional factors (disability and independence of activities of daily living) were assessed using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: The proportion of older people with a history of falls was 18.6%. The results of multiple logistic regression revealed aged between 75-84 years (OR=1.61; 95% CI=1.20, 2.15; p=0.001), aged ≥85 years (OR=3.32; 95% CI=1.23, 8.65; p=0.014), women (OR=1.67; 95% CI=1.31, 2.11; p <0.001), and at risk of depression (OR=1.39; 95% CI=1.02, 1.89; p=0.035) were significantly associated with falls. Fewer hours of sleep in a day was associated with increased risk of falls (OR=0.91; 95% CI=0.84, 0.98; p=0.017). The Malays (OR=0.52; 95% CI=0.33, 0.84; p=0.007) and Chinese (OR=0.45; 95% CI=0.27, 0.73; p=0.014) ethnic groups were less likely to falls when compared to Indian and others ethnicity. Conclusion: Knowing these predictors for falls could facilitate in identifying older people who might benefit from early falls prevention interventions in the community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-90
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Independent Living
Malaysia
Sleep
Psychology
Health
Depression
Loneliness
Intrinsic Factor
Activities of Daily Living
Psychological Stress
Ethnic Groups
Social Support
Psychiatry
Logistic Models
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Accidental falls
  • Aged
  • Depression
  • Gender
  • Malaysia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Associations between falls and psychosocial factors, self-rated health, disability and sleep among community dwelling older people in Malaysia. / Sazlina, Shariff Ghazali; Chan, Yoke Mun; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Shahar, Suzana; Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur.

In: Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 85-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Shahar, Suzana

AU - Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur

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AB - Background/Objective: Falls among older people leads to major consequences, which affects their quality of life. The causes are multifactorial, a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which include psychosocial and functional factors. This study aimed to determine the association between falls and the psychosocial factors, self-rated health, disability and sleep among community dwelling older people in Malaysia. Methods: This study utilized the first wave data from the Towards Useful Ageing (TUA) cohort. A total of 1993 adults aged ≥60 years with no diagnosed psychiatric illness; without and with mild or moderate cognitive impairment were included in the analyses. Risk of falls, psychosocial factors (perceived stress, life satisfaction, loneliness, depression, social support, and sleep duration) and functional factors (disability and independence of activities of daily living) were assessed using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: The proportion of older people with a history of falls was 18.6%. The results of multiple logistic regression revealed aged between 75-84 years (OR=1.61; 95% CI=1.20, 2.15; p=0.001), aged ≥85 years (OR=3.32; 95% CI=1.23, 8.65; p=0.014), women (OR=1.67; 95% CI=1.31, 2.11; p <0.001), and at risk of depression (OR=1.39; 95% CI=1.02, 1.89; p=0.035) were significantly associated with falls. Fewer hours of sleep in a day was associated with increased risk of falls (OR=0.91; 95% CI=0.84, 0.98; p=0.017). The Malays (OR=0.52; 95% CI=0.33, 0.84; p=0.007) and Chinese (OR=0.45; 95% CI=0.27, 0.73; p=0.014) ethnic groups were less likely to falls when compared to Indian and others ethnicity. Conclusion: Knowing these predictors for falls could facilitate in identifying older people who might benefit from early falls prevention interventions in the community.

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