Association of social support and quality of life among people with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric service

A cross-sectional study

Thurkadevi Munikanan, Marhani Midin, Tuti Iryani Mohd Daud, Riana Abdul Rahim, Abdul Kadir Abu Bakar, Nik Ruzyanei Nik Jaafar, Hatta Sidi, Najwa Baharuddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To understand the needs of patients with schizophrenia for recovery, this study examined the type and level of social support and its association with quality of life (QOL) among this group of patients in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 individuals with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric services in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL). The WHOQOL-BREF, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used to assess QOL, severity of symptoms and social support, respectively. The study respondents were predominantly Malay, aged less than 40, males, single, unmarried, had lower education levels and unemployed. Results About 72% of the respondents had poor perceived social support, with support from significant others being the lowest, followed by friends and family. From multiple regression analysis, social support (total, friend and family) significantly predicted better QOL in all domains; [B = 0.315 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.001), B = 0.257 (p < 0.031)] respectively in Physical Domain; [B = 0.491 (p < 0.001), B = 0.735 (p < 0.001), B = 0.631 (p < 0.001)] in Psychological Domain; [B = 1.065 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.017), B = 2.076 (p < 0.001)] in Social Domain and; [B = 0.652 (p < 0.001), B = 1.199 (p < 0.001), B = 0.678 (p < 0.001)] in Environmental Domain. Being married and having shorter duration of illness, lower BPRS (total) scores, female gender and smoking, were also found to significantly predict higher QOL. Conclusion Social support is an important missing component among people with schizophrenia who are already receiving formal psychiatric services in Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-102
Number of pages9
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume75
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

Fingerprint

Community Psychiatry
Social Welfare
Social Support
Schizophrenia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Quality of Life
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Malaysia
Psychiatry
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Psychology
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Association of social support and quality of life among people with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric service : A cross-sectional study. / Munikanan, Thurkadevi; Midin, Marhani; Mohd Daud, Tuti Iryani; Rahim, Riana Abdul; Bakar, Abdul Kadir Abu; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Sidi, Hatta; Baharuddin, Najwa.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 75, 01.05.2017, p. 94-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1a8859d0d0f641efb283fe1a0a601acc,
title = "Association of social support and quality of life among people with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric service: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Objective To understand the needs of patients with schizophrenia for recovery, this study examined the type and level of social support and its association with quality of life (QOL) among this group of patients in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 individuals with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric services in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL). The WHOQOL-BREF, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used to assess QOL, severity of symptoms and social support, respectively. The study respondents were predominantly Malay, aged less than 40, males, single, unmarried, had lower education levels and unemployed. Results About 72{\%} of the respondents had poor perceived social support, with support from significant others being the lowest, followed by friends and family. From multiple regression analysis, social support (total, friend and family) significantly predicted better QOL in all domains; [B = 0.315 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.001), B = 0.257 (p < 0.031)] respectively in Physical Domain; [B = 0.491 (p < 0.001), B = 0.735 (p < 0.001), B = 0.631 (p < 0.001)] in Psychological Domain; [B = 1.065 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.017), B = 2.076 (p < 0.001)] in Social Domain and; [B = 0.652 (p < 0.001), B = 1.199 (p < 0.001), B = 0.678 (p < 0.001)] in Environmental Domain. Being married and having shorter duration of illness, lower BPRS (total) scores, female gender and smoking, were also found to significantly predict higher QOL. Conclusion Social support is an important missing component among people with schizophrenia who are already receiving formal psychiatric services in Malaysia.",
author = "Thurkadevi Munikanan and Marhani Midin and {Mohd Daud}, {Tuti Iryani} and Rahim, {Riana Abdul} and Bakar, {Abdul Kadir Abu} and {Nik Jaafar}, {Nik Ruzyanei} and Hatta Sidi and Najwa Baharuddin",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.02.009",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "94--102",
journal = "Comprehensive Psychiatry",
issn = "0010-440X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of social support and quality of life among people with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric service

T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Munikanan, Thurkadevi

AU - Midin, Marhani

AU - Mohd Daud, Tuti Iryani

AU - Rahim, Riana Abdul

AU - Bakar, Abdul Kadir Abu

AU - Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei

AU - Sidi, Hatta

AU - Baharuddin, Najwa

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Objective To understand the needs of patients with schizophrenia for recovery, this study examined the type and level of social support and its association with quality of life (QOL) among this group of patients in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 individuals with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric services in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL). The WHOQOL-BREF, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used to assess QOL, severity of symptoms and social support, respectively. The study respondents were predominantly Malay, aged less than 40, males, single, unmarried, had lower education levels and unemployed. Results About 72% of the respondents had poor perceived social support, with support from significant others being the lowest, followed by friends and family. From multiple regression analysis, social support (total, friend and family) significantly predicted better QOL in all domains; [B = 0.315 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.001), B = 0.257 (p < 0.031)] respectively in Physical Domain; [B = 0.491 (p < 0.001), B = 0.735 (p < 0.001), B = 0.631 (p < 0.001)] in Psychological Domain; [B = 1.065 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.017), B = 2.076 (p < 0.001)] in Social Domain and; [B = 0.652 (p < 0.001), B = 1.199 (p < 0.001), B = 0.678 (p < 0.001)] in Environmental Domain. Being married and having shorter duration of illness, lower BPRS (total) scores, female gender and smoking, were also found to significantly predict higher QOL. Conclusion Social support is an important missing component among people with schizophrenia who are already receiving formal psychiatric services in Malaysia.

AB - Objective To understand the needs of patients with schizophrenia for recovery, this study examined the type and level of social support and its association with quality of life (QOL) among this group of patients in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 individuals with schizophrenia receiving community psychiatric services in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL). The WHOQOL-BREF, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used to assess QOL, severity of symptoms and social support, respectively. The study respondents were predominantly Malay, aged less than 40, males, single, unmarried, had lower education levels and unemployed. Results About 72% of the respondents had poor perceived social support, with support from significant others being the lowest, followed by friends and family. From multiple regression analysis, social support (total, friend and family) significantly predicted better QOL in all domains; [B = 0.315 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.001), B = 0.257 (p < 0.031)] respectively in Physical Domain; [B = 0.491 (p < 0.001), B = 0.735 (p < 0.001), B = 0.631 (p < 0.001)] in Psychological Domain; [B = 1.065 (p < 0.001), B = 0.670 (p < 0.017), B = 2.076 (p < 0.001)] in Social Domain and; [B = 0.652 (p < 0.001), B = 1.199 (p < 0.001), B = 0.678 (p < 0.001)] in Environmental Domain. Being married and having shorter duration of illness, lower BPRS (total) scores, female gender and smoking, were also found to significantly predict higher QOL. Conclusion Social support is an important missing component among people with schizophrenia who are already receiving formal psychiatric services in Malaysia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015922642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015922642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.02.009

DO - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.02.009

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 94

EP - 102

JO - Comprehensive Psychiatry

JF - Comprehensive Psychiatry

SN - 0010-440X

ER -