Association of fruit and vegetable consumption with mild cognitive impairment among older persons living in low-cost residential areas in Kuala lumpur

I. Intan Hafizah, Zahara Abdul Manaf, S. Noramilin, Suzana Shahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The benefits of sufficient fruits and vegetables consumption for health are well known. This study investigated the adequacy of fruit and vegetable intake among older persons and its association with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The study also identified motivation and barrier factors affecting fruit and vegetables consumption. Methods: A total of 114 respondents aged 60-years and above (25 and 89 respomdents with and without MCI, respectively) from low cost housing areas in Kuala Lumpur participated in the study. Participants were interviewed using a standardised questionnaire with neurocognitive testing scales to determine their cognition level. Results: Of the non-MCI participants, 15.7% met World Health Organisation's (WHO) (2003) recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption of 400 g/ day compared to 12.0% of the subjects with MCI (p < 0.05). Participants without MCI also had a significantly higher intake of fruit and vegetables (281.6 ± 77.2 g/ day) compared to those with MCI (250.4 ± 51.3 g/ day). Total daily intake of vegetables and fruits was significantly correlated with the digit span score of the participants (r=0.214, p < 0.02). Total daily intake of leafy green vegetables was correlated with the verbal memory domain score of the total digit span (r=0.254, p < 0.01). The main motivating factor for taking fruits, vegetables, and 'ulam' (salad) was their belief in its health benefits. The main barriers to their consumption were dental problems, and a dislike of their taste. Conclusion: Generally, the intake of fruits and vegetables among older persons was inadequate and was associated with poorer cognitive functions. Improvement of oral health status and the provision of more choices of fruits and vegetables for older persons may increase their daily intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-344
Number of pages10
JournalMalaysian Journal of Nutrition
Volume21
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

residential areas
vegetable consumption
fruit consumption
Vegetables
Fruit
Costs and Cost Analysis
cognition
vegetables
health beliefs
Cognition
fruits
salads
green leafy vegetables
World Health Organization
Cognitive Dysfunction
health status
mouth
teeth
questionnaires
Oral Health

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Cognitive
  • Fruits
  • Motivation
  • Older persons
  • Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{2e145be1477643cbb0d2b9bfc30ec5a6,
title = "Association of fruit and vegetable consumption with mild cognitive impairment among older persons living in low-cost residential areas in Kuala lumpur",
abstract = "Introduction: The benefits of sufficient fruits and vegetables consumption for health are well known. This study investigated the adequacy of fruit and vegetable intake among older persons and its association with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The study also identified motivation and barrier factors affecting fruit and vegetables consumption. Methods: A total of 114 respondents aged 60-years and above (25 and 89 respomdents with and without MCI, respectively) from low cost housing areas in Kuala Lumpur participated in the study. Participants were interviewed using a standardised questionnaire with neurocognitive testing scales to determine their cognition level. Results: Of the non-MCI participants, 15.7{\%} met World Health Organisation's (WHO) (2003) recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption of 400 g/ day compared to 12.0{\%} of the subjects with MCI (p < 0.05). Participants without MCI also had a significantly higher intake of fruit and vegetables (281.6 ± 77.2 g/ day) compared to those with MCI (250.4 ± 51.3 g/ day). Total daily intake of vegetables and fruits was significantly correlated with the digit span score of the participants (r=0.214, p < 0.02). Total daily intake of leafy green vegetables was correlated with the verbal memory domain score of the total digit span (r=0.254, p < 0.01). The main motivating factor for taking fruits, vegetables, and 'ulam' (salad) was their belief in its health benefits. The main barriers to their consumption were dental problems, and a dislike of their taste. Conclusion: Generally, the intake of fruits and vegetables among older persons was inadequate and was associated with poorer cognitive functions. Improvement of oral health status and the provision of more choices of fruits and vegetables for older persons may increase their daily intake.",
keywords = "Barriers, Cognitive, Fruits, Motivation, Older persons, Vegetables",
author = "{Intan Hafizah}, I. and {Abdul Manaf}, Zahara and S. Noramilin and Suzana Shahar",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "335--344",
journal = "Malaysian Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "1394-035X",
publisher = "Persatuan Pemakanan Malaysia",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of fruit and vegetable consumption with mild cognitive impairment among older persons living in low-cost residential areas in Kuala lumpur

AU - Intan Hafizah, I.

AU - Abdul Manaf, Zahara

AU - Noramilin, S.

AU - Shahar, Suzana

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Introduction: The benefits of sufficient fruits and vegetables consumption for health are well known. This study investigated the adequacy of fruit and vegetable intake among older persons and its association with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The study also identified motivation and barrier factors affecting fruit and vegetables consumption. Methods: A total of 114 respondents aged 60-years and above (25 and 89 respomdents with and without MCI, respectively) from low cost housing areas in Kuala Lumpur participated in the study. Participants were interviewed using a standardised questionnaire with neurocognitive testing scales to determine their cognition level. Results: Of the non-MCI participants, 15.7% met World Health Organisation's (WHO) (2003) recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption of 400 g/ day compared to 12.0% of the subjects with MCI (p < 0.05). Participants without MCI also had a significantly higher intake of fruit and vegetables (281.6 ± 77.2 g/ day) compared to those with MCI (250.4 ± 51.3 g/ day). Total daily intake of vegetables and fruits was significantly correlated with the digit span score of the participants (r=0.214, p < 0.02). Total daily intake of leafy green vegetables was correlated with the verbal memory domain score of the total digit span (r=0.254, p < 0.01). The main motivating factor for taking fruits, vegetables, and 'ulam' (salad) was their belief in its health benefits. The main barriers to their consumption were dental problems, and a dislike of their taste. Conclusion: Generally, the intake of fruits and vegetables among older persons was inadequate and was associated with poorer cognitive functions. Improvement of oral health status and the provision of more choices of fruits and vegetables for older persons may increase their daily intake.

AB - Introduction: The benefits of sufficient fruits and vegetables consumption for health are well known. This study investigated the adequacy of fruit and vegetable intake among older persons and its association with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The study also identified motivation and barrier factors affecting fruit and vegetables consumption. Methods: A total of 114 respondents aged 60-years and above (25 and 89 respomdents with and without MCI, respectively) from low cost housing areas in Kuala Lumpur participated in the study. Participants were interviewed using a standardised questionnaire with neurocognitive testing scales to determine their cognition level. Results: Of the non-MCI participants, 15.7% met World Health Organisation's (WHO) (2003) recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption of 400 g/ day compared to 12.0% of the subjects with MCI (p < 0.05). Participants without MCI also had a significantly higher intake of fruit and vegetables (281.6 ± 77.2 g/ day) compared to those with MCI (250.4 ± 51.3 g/ day). Total daily intake of vegetables and fruits was significantly correlated with the digit span score of the participants (r=0.214, p < 0.02). Total daily intake of leafy green vegetables was correlated with the verbal memory domain score of the total digit span (r=0.254, p < 0.01). The main motivating factor for taking fruits, vegetables, and 'ulam' (salad) was their belief in its health benefits. The main barriers to their consumption were dental problems, and a dislike of their taste. Conclusion: Generally, the intake of fruits and vegetables among older persons was inadequate and was associated with poorer cognitive functions. Improvement of oral health status and the provision of more choices of fruits and vegetables for older persons may increase their daily intake.

KW - Barriers

KW - Cognitive

KW - Fruits

KW - Motivation

KW - Older persons

KW - Vegetables

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011333406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011333406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85011333406

VL - 21

SP - 335

EP - 344

JO - Malaysian Journal of Nutrition

JF - Malaysian Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1394-035X

IS - 3

ER -