Association of elevated blood pressure and impaired vasorelaxation in experimental Sprague-Dawley rats fed with heated vegetable oil

Xin Fang Leong, Mohd Rais Mustafa, Srijit Das, Kamsiah Jaarin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Poor control of blood pressure leads to hypertension which is a major risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. The present study aimed to explore possible mechanisms of elevation in blood pressure following consumption of heated vegetable oil. Methods: Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into six groups: Group I (control) - normal rat chow, Group II - fresh soy oil, Group III - soy oil heated once, Group IV - soy oil heated twice, Group V - soy oil heated five times, Group VI - soy oil heated ten times. Blood pressure was measured at the baseline level and at a monthly interval for six months. Plasma nitric oxide, heme oxygenase and angiotensin-converting enzyme levels were measured prior to treatment, at month-three and month-six later. At the end of treatment, the rats were sacrificed and thoracic aortas were taken for measurement of vascular reactivity. Results: Blood pressure increased significantly (p < 0.01) in the repeatedly heated oil groups compared to the control and fresh soy oil groups. Consumption of diet containing repeatedly heated oil resulted higher plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme level and lower nitric oxide content and heme oxygenase concentration. Reheated soy oil groups exhibited attenuated relaxation in response to acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside, and greater contraction to phenylephrine. Conclusion. As a result of consumption of repeatedly heated soy oil, an elevation in blood pressure was observed which may be due to the quantitative changes in endothelium dependent and independent factors including enzymes directly involved in the regulation of blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Article number66
JournalLipids in Health and Disease
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Plant Oils
Blood pressure
Vasodilation
Sprague Dawley Rats
Rats
Oils
Blood Pressure
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Nitric Oxide
Plasmas
Nitroprusside
Phenylephrine
Nutrition
Thoracic Aorta
Acetylcholine
Endothelium
Blood Vessels
Cardiovascular Diseases
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Association of elevated blood pressure and impaired vasorelaxation in experimental Sprague-Dawley rats fed with heated vegetable oil. / Leong, Xin Fang; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Das, Srijit; Jaarin, Kamsiah.

In: Lipids in Health and Disease, Vol. 9, 66, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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