Association of dental trauma experience and first-aid knowledge among rugby players in Malaysia

Dalia Abdullah, Kia Cheen Amy Liew, Wan Noorina Wan Ahmad, Selina Khoo, Fay Chwee Lin Wee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess and compare the knowledge of rugby players regarding first-aid measures for dental injuries. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at rugby tournaments in 2009 and 2010 on players aged 16 and over. Convenient sampling was performed. A total of 456 self-administered questionnaires were returned. Data collected were analysed using SPSS 21. Descriptive analysis was undertaken for the demographic data. The subjects were classified according to their experience of sustaining each type of injury. Cross-tabulation and chi-square tests were carried out to compare the responses. When the expected cell count was less than five, Fisher's exact test was used. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The prevalence of self-reported dental injuries was as follows: tooth fracture (19.3%), luxation (6.6%) and avulsion (1.1%). Significant differences were found, whereby 52.2% of those who had no history of tooth fracture were more likely to seek immediate treatment (P < 0.001), whereas 42% of those who previously experienced tooth fracture claimed that they would only visit a dentist if they experienced pain (P = 0.001). Management of luxation and avulsion did not differ significantly between the groups. However, about half of those who did not have a history of tooth avulsion admitted to not knowing the correct answer, while three of five casualties would keep the tooth iced. Conclusions: Knowledge of the management of tooth fracture and storage medium differs between previous casualties and non-casualties. Overall, knowledge of dental trauma management was insufficient, suggesting the need to educate and train the players.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-408
Number of pages6
JournalDental Traumatology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Tooth Fractures
First Aid
Football
Malaysia
Tooth
Tooth Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Tooth Avulsion
Knowledge Management
Chi-Square Distribution
Dentists
Cell Count
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Pain

Keywords

  • Athletic injuries
  • Dental trauma
  • Tooth avulsions
  • Tooth fractures
  • Tooth injury
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Association of dental trauma experience and first-aid knowledge among rugby players in Malaysia. / Abdullah, Dalia; Liew, Kia Cheen Amy; Wan Ahmad, Wan Noorina; Khoo, Selina; Wee, Fay Chwee Lin.

In: Dental Traumatology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 403-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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