Association between intake of soy isoflavones and blood pressure among urban and rural Malaysian adults

Nurul Fatin Malek Rivan, Suzana Shahar, Hasnah Haron, Rashidah Ambak, Fatimah Othman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Intake of soy isoflavones has been shown to be beneficial in reducing blood pressure, a known cardiovascular risk factor. This study investigated the association between intake of soy isoflavones and blood pressure among multiethnic Malaysian adults. Methods: A total of 230 non-institutionalised Malaysians aged 18-81 years were recruited through multi-stage random sampling from urban and rural areas in four conveniently selected states. Participants were interviewed on socio-demographics, medical history, smoking status, and physical activity. Measurements of height, weight, waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure (BP) were taken. Information on usual intake of soy foods was obtained using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Results: The mean intake of soy protein of both urban (3.40g/day) and rural participants (3.01g/day) were lower than the USFDA recommended intake level of soy protein (25.00g/day). Urban participants had significantly higher intake of isoflavones (9.35±11.31mg/ day) compared to the rural participants (7.88±14.30mg/day). Mean BP levels were significantly lower among urban (136/81mmHg) than rural adults (142/83mmHg). After adjusting for age, gender, educational level, household income, smoking status, physical activity, BMI and WC, soy protein intake was significantly associated with both SBP (R2=0.205, β=-0.136) and DBP (R2=0.110, β=-0.104), whilst soy isoflavones intake was significantly associated with SBP (β=-0.131). Intake of 1 mg of isoflavone is estimated to lower SBP by 7.97 mmHg. Conclusion: Higher consumption of isoflavones among the urban participants showed an association with lower levels of SBP. Use of biological markers for estimating isoflavones levels is recommended to investigate its protective effects on blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-393
Number of pages13
JournalMalaysian Journal of Nutrition
Volume24
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Isoflavones
isoflavones
blood pressure
Blood Pressure
Soybean Proteins
soy protein
waist circumference
smoking (food products)
Waist Circumference
physical activity
Smoking
Soy Foods
medical history
household income
food frequency questionnaires
educational status
United States Food and Drug Administration
protein intake
rural areas
urban areas

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Soy isoflavones
  • Soy protein
  • Systolic blood pressure
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Association between intake of soy isoflavones and blood pressure among urban and rural Malaysian adults. / Malek Rivan, Nurul Fatin; Shahar, Suzana; Haron, Hasnah; Ambak, Rashidah; Othman, Fatimah.

In: Malaysian Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 381-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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