Association between belief and attitude toward preference of complementary alternative medicine use

Farida Hanim Islahudin, Intan Azura Shahdan, Suzani Mohamad-Samuri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a steep increase in the consumer use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM), with many users unaware of the need to inform their health care providers. Various predictors including psychosocial factors such as beliefs and behavior have been accounted for preference toward CAM use, with varying results. Methods: This study investigates the belief and attitude regarding preference toward CAM use among the Malaysian population by using a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study. Results: A large majority of the 1,009 respondents admitted to taking at least one type of CAM (n=730, 72.3%). Only 20 (1.9%) respondents were found to have negative beliefs (total score,35), 4 (0.4%) respondents had neutral beliefs (total score =35), and 985 (97.6%) respondents had positive belief toward CAM (total score.36). A total of 507 (50.2%) respondents were categorized as having a negative CAM attitude, while 502 (49.8%) respondents were categorized as having a positive CAM attitude. It was demonstrated that there was a positive correlation between belief and attitude score (ρ=0.409, P,0.001). Therefore, the higher the belief in CAM, the more positive the attitude was toward CAM. Those who were using CAM showed a stronger belief (P=0.002), with a more positive attitude (P,0.001) toward it, than those who were not using CAM. Conclusion: Identifying belief regarding preference toward CAM use among the public could potentially reveal those with a higher tendency to use CAM. This is important as not everyone feels the need to reveal the use of CAM to their health care providers, which could lead to serious repercussions such as interactions and adverse effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-918
Number of pages6
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 May 2017

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alternative medicine
Complementary Therapies
health care
psychosocial factors
cross-sectional study
Health Personnel

Keywords

  • Attitude
  • Belief
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Malaysia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Association between belief and attitude toward preference of complementary alternative medicine use. / Islahudin, Farida Hanim; Shahdan, Intan Azura; Mohamad-Samuri, Suzani.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 11, 10.05.2017, p. 913-918.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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