Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment

Siti Azdiah Abdul Aziz, Megan McStea, Nor Syuhada Ahmad Bashah, Meng Li Chong, Sasheela Ponnampalavanar, Sharifah Faridah Syed Omar, Helmi Sulaiman, Iskandar Azwa, Maw Pin Tan, Adeeba Kamarulzaman, Reena Rajasuriar, Shahrul Bahyah Kamaruzzaman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: In a clinic-based, treated HIV-infected cohort, we identified individuals with sarcopenia and compared with age, sex and ethnically matched controls; and investigated associated risk factors and health outcomes. Design: Sarcopenia (age-related muscle loss) causes significant morbidity to the elderly, leading to frequent hospitalizations, disability and death. Few have characterized sarcopenia in the HIV-infected who experience accelerated aging. Methods: Sarcopenia was defined as low muscle mass with weak grip strength and/or slow gait speed using lower 20th percentiles of controls. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were used to explore risk factors and health-related outcomes associated with sarcopenia among HIV-infected individuals. Results: We recruited 315 HIV-infected individuals aged at least 25 years with at least 1-year history of undetectable viral load on treatment (HIV RNA <50 copies/ml). Percentage of sarcopenia in 315 HIV-infected was 8%. Subsequently, 153 of the 315 were paired with age, sex and ethnically matched HIV-uninfected. The percentage of sarcopenia in the HIV-infected (n = 153) compared with uninfected (n = 153) were 10 vs. 6% (P = 0.193) respectively, whereas of those at least 50 years of age among them were 17% vs. 4% (P = 0.049), respectively. Associated risk factors among the HIV-infected include education level, employment status, BMI, baseline CD4+ cell count, duration on NRTIs and GGT levels. Identified negative outcomes include mortality risk scores [5.42; 95% CI 1.46-9.37; P = 0.007) and functional disability (3.95; 95% CI 1.57-9.97; P = 0.004). Conclusion: Sarcopenia is more prevalent in HIV-infected at least 50 years old compared with matched controls. Our findings highlight associations between sarcopenia with loss of independence and greater healthcare burden among treated HIV-infected individuals necessitating early recognition and intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1025-1034
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2018

Fingerprint

Sarcopenia
HIV
Therapeutics
Muscles
Health
Hand Strength
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Linear Models
Hospitalization
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • aging
  • health outcomes
  • HIV
  • middle-age
  • risk factors
  • sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Abdul Aziz, S. A., McStea, M., Ahmad Bashah, N. S., Chong, M. L., Ponnampalavanar, S., Syed Omar, S. F., ... Kamaruzzaman, S. B. (2018). Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment. AIDS, 32(8), 1025-1034. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001798

Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment. / Abdul Aziz, Siti Azdiah; McStea, Megan; Ahmad Bashah, Nor Syuhada; Chong, Meng Li; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Sulaiman, Helmi; Azwa, Iskandar; Tan, Maw Pin; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Rajasuriar, Reena; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah.

In: AIDS, Vol. 32, No. 8, 15.05.2018, p. 1025-1034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdul Aziz, SA, McStea, M, Ahmad Bashah, NS, Chong, ML, Ponnampalavanar, S, Syed Omar, SF, Sulaiman, H, Azwa, I, Tan, MP, Kamarulzaman, A, Rajasuriar, R & Kamaruzzaman, SB 2018, 'Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment', AIDS, vol. 32, no. 8, pp. 1025-1034. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001798
Abdul Aziz SA, McStea M, Ahmad Bashah NS, Chong ML, Ponnampalavanar S, Syed Omar SF et al. Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment. AIDS. 2018 May 15;32(8):1025-1034. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001798
Abdul Aziz, Siti Azdiah ; McStea, Megan ; Ahmad Bashah, Nor Syuhada ; Chong, Meng Li ; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela ; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah ; Sulaiman, Helmi ; Azwa, Iskandar ; Tan, Maw Pin ; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba ; Rajasuriar, Reena ; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah. / Assessment of sarcopenia in virally suppressed HIV-infected Asians receiving treatment. In: AIDS. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 8. pp. 1025-1034.
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AU - McStea, Megan

AU - Ahmad Bashah, Nor Syuhada

AU - Chong, Meng Li

AU - Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela

AU - Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah

AU - Sulaiman, Helmi

AU - Azwa, Iskandar

AU - Tan, Maw Pin

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N2 - Objectives: In a clinic-based, treated HIV-infected cohort, we identified individuals with sarcopenia and compared with age, sex and ethnically matched controls; and investigated associated risk factors and health outcomes. Design: Sarcopenia (age-related muscle loss) causes significant morbidity to the elderly, leading to frequent hospitalizations, disability and death. Few have characterized sarcopenia in the HIV-infected who experience accelerated aging. Methods: Sarcopenia was defined as low muscle mass with weak grip strength and/or slow gait speed using lower 20th percentiles of controls. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were used to explore risk factors and health-related outcomes associated with sarcopenia among HIV-infected individuals. Results: We recruited 315 HIV-infected individuals aged at least 25 years with at least 1-year history of undetectable viral load on treatment (HIV RNA <50 copies/ml). Percentage of sarcopenia in 315 HIV-infected was 8%. Subsequently, 153 of the 315 were paired with age, sex and ethnically matched HIV-uninfected. The percentage of sarcopenia in the HIV-infected (n = 153) compared with uninfected (n = 153) were 10 vs. 6% (P = 0.193) respectively, whereas of those at least 50 years of age among them were 17% vs. 4% (P = 0.049), respectively. Associated risk factors among the HIV-infected include education level, employment status, BMI, baseline CD4+ cell count, duration on NRTIs and GGT levels. Identified negative outcomes include mortality risk scores [5.42; 95% CI 1.46-9.37; P = 0.007) and functional disability (3.95; 95% CI 1.57-9.97; P = 0.004). Conclusion: Sarcopenia is more prevalent in HIV-infected at least 50 years old compared with matched controls. Our findings highlight associations between sarcopenia with loss of independence and greater healthcare burden among treated HIV-infected individuals necessitating early recognition and intervention.

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