Assessment of logging damage in a Malaysian hill dipterocarp forest

Saiful Islam, A. Latiff

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A before-and-after logging study of primary hill dipterocarp rain forest of Peninsular Malaysia was conducted through systematic sampling and survey along the gradient directed transect covering different topographic locations to assess the harvesting damage to trees and forest floor in two study compartments of Ulu Muda Forest Reserve, Kedah. The study area was surveyed before it was logged, and after six months to one year of the completion of logging, resurveying of the same study plots was done. A mechanical system of logging using heavy bulldozer was employed. The results of selective logging showed that overall extraction of 27 trees per hectare affected all diameter classes and out of 47.0 % of total injury, 40.1% of stems were totally smashed and dead. There was no direct or linear relationship between harvesting intensity (number of trees or volume felled) and incidental damage to trees. Instead of harvesting intensity, the intensity of ground damage caused by logging methods applied in the study site was strongly related with the amount of damage to trees. High percentage of ground damage in Compartment 29 was associated with higher proportion of stem smashed as compared to Compartmet 28. The results were compared with a range of other studies in Malaysia and abroad. This study strongly suggests careful planning and execution of improved logging practices reported elsewhere.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)207-228
    Number of pages22
    JournalMalaysian Forester
    Volume71
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

    Fingerprint

    Dipterocarpaceae
    logging
    damage
    Malaysia
    stem
    selective logging
    bulldozers
    forest floor
    stems
    forest reserves
    forest litter
    transect
    rain forests
    planning
    sampling

    Keywords

    • Bole injury
    • Crown injury
    • Ground area damage
    • Logging damage
    • Selective logging

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Forestry

    Cite this

    Assessment of logging damage in a Malaysian hill dipterocarp forest. / Islam, Saiful; Latiff, A.

    In: Malaysian Forester, Vol. 71, No. 2, 07.2008, p. 207-228.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Islam, S & Latiff, A 2008, 'Assessment of logging damage in a Malaysian hill dipterocarp forest', Malaysian Forester, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 207-228.
    Islam, Saiful ; Latiff, A. / Assessment of logging damage in a Malaysian hill dipterocarp forest. In: Malaysian Forester. 2008 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 207-228.
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