Assessment of atmospheric impacts of biomass open burning in Kalimantan, Borneo during 2004

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomass burning from the combustion of agricultural wastes and forest materials is one of the major sources of air pollution. The objective of the study is to investigate the major contribution of the biomass open burning events in the island of Borneo, Indonesia to the degradation of air quality in equatorial Southeast Asia. A total of 10173 active fire counts were detected by the MODIS Aqua satellite during August 2004, and consequently, elevated the PM10 concentration levels at six air quality stations in the state of Sarawak, in east Malaysia, which is located in northwestern Borneo. The PM10 concentrations measured on a daily basis were above the 50μgm-3 criteria as stipulated by the World Health Organization Air Quality Guidelines for most of the month, and exceeded the 24-h Recommended Malaysian Air Quality Guidelines of 150μgm-3 on three separate periods from the 13th to the 30th August 2004. The average correlation between the ground level PM10 concentrations and the satellite derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.3 at several ground level air quality stations, implied the moderate relationship between the aerosols over the depth of the entire column of atmosphere and the ground level suspended particulate matter. Multiple regression for meteorological parameters such as rainfall, windspeed, visibility, mean temperature, relative humidity at two stations in Sarawak and active fire counts that were located near the centre of fire activities were only able to explain for 61% of the total variation in the AOD.The trajectory analysis of the low level mesoscale meteorological conditions simulated by the TAPM model illustrated the influence of the sea and land breezes within the lowest part of the planetary boundary layer, embedded within the prevailing monsoonal southwesterlies, in circulating the aged and new air particles within Sarawak.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-249
Number of pages8
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume78
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Fingerprint

air quality
biomass
aerosol
optical depth
Aqua (satellite)
World Health Organization
suspended particulate matter
biomass burning
visibility
MODIS
multiple regression
relative humidity
atmospheric pollution
boundary layer
combustion
trajectory
rainfall
degradation
atmosphere
air

Keywords

  • Aerosols
  • Biomass open burning
  • Southeast Asia
  • Transboundary haze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Assessment of atmospheric impacts of biomass open burning in Kalimantan, Borneo during 2004. / Mahmud, Mastura.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 78, 10.2013, p. 242-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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