Assessment in undergraduate medical education: Bangladesh perspectives

M. Haque, R. Yousuf, S. M. Abu Bakar, Abdus Salam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Medical education in Bangladesh is totally controlled by the Government and run a unique undergraduate curriculum throughout the country in both public and private sectors. This paper is aimed to briefly describe the medical education reform in Bangladesh and suggests further assessment changes. The present official form of undergraduate medical curriculum has first evolved in 1988 followed by revision in 2002 and 2012. Assessment and teaching are the two sides of the same coin. Assessment drives learning and learning drives practices. Following the curriculum reform since 2002, the assessment in undergraduate medical education has been greatly changed. There are a lot of in-course formative assessments which include item examination, card final and term final, designed to improve the quality of education. Ten percent marks of summative written examinations derive from formative assessment. Traditional oral examination has been changed to structured form to ensure greater reliability. Even then, teachers are not yet building up to conduct oral examination in such a structured way. Examiners differ in their personality, style and level of experience with variation of questioning and scoring from student to students. Weakness of reliability on oral examination still exists. Students also feel very stressful during the oral examinations. Moreover, to conduct such oral examination, three to four months times per year are lost by the faculties which can be efficiently utilised for teaching and research purposes. Worlds' leading medical schools now-a-days used oral examination only for borderline and distinction students. Bangladesh also must consider oral examination only for borderline and distinction students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalBangladesh Journal of Medical Science
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Undergraduate Medical Education
Oral Diagnosis
Bangladesh
Students
Curriculum
Medical Education
Teaching
Learning
Private Sector
Public Sector
Medical Schools
Personality
Education

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Bangladesh
  • Medical education
  • Oral-examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Assessment in undergraduate medical education : Bangladesh perspectives. / Haque, M.; Yousuf, R.; Abu Bakar, S. M.; Salam, Abdus.

In: Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science, Vol. 12, No. 4, 2013, p. 357-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haque, M. ; Yousuf, R. ; Abu Bakar, S. M. ; Salam, Abdus. / Assessment in undergraduate medical education : Bangladesh perspectives. In: Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 357-363.
@article{c530c5ef25cf474593c2f1cfc6150a5e,
title = "Assessment in undergraduate medical education: Bangladesh perspectives",
abstract = "Background: Medical education in Bangladesh is totally controlled by the Government and run a unique undergraduate curriculum throughout the country in both public and private sectors. This paper is aimed to briefly describe the medical education reform in Bangladesh and suggests further assessment changes. The present official form of undergraduate medical curriculum has first evolved in 1988 followed by revision in 2002 and 2012. Assessment and teaching are the two sides of the same coin. Assessment drives learning and learning drives practices. Following the curriculum reform since 2002, the assessment in undergraduate medical education has been greatly changed. There are a lot of in-course formative assessments which include item examination, card final and term final, designed to improve the quality of education. Ten percent marks of summative written examinations derive from formative assessment. Traditional oral examination has been changed to structured form to ensure greater reliability. Even then, teachers are not yet building up to conduct oral examination in such a structured way. Examiners differ in their personality, style and level of experience with variation of questioning and scoring from student to students. Weakness of reliability on oral examination still exists. Students also feel very stressful during the oral examinations. Moreover, to conduct such oral examination, three to four months times per year are lost by the faculties which can be efficiently utilised for teaching and research purposes. Worlds' leading medical schools now-a-days used oral examination only for borderline and distinction students. Bangladesh also must consider oral examination only for borderline and distinction students.",
keywords = "Assessment, Bangladesh, Medical education, Oral-examination",
author = "M. Haque and R. Yousuf and {Abu Bakar}, {S. M.} and Abdus Salam",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3329/bjms.v12i4.16658",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "357--363",
journal = "Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science",
issn = "2223-4721",
publisher = "Ibn Sina Trust",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment in undergraduate medical education

T2 - Bangladesh perspectives

AU - Haque, M.

AU - Yousuf, R.

AU - Abu Bakar, S. M.

AU - Salam, Abdus

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Medical education in Bangladesh is totally controlled by the Government and run a unique undergraduate curriculum throughout the country in both public and private sectors. This paper is aimed to briefly describe the medical education reform in Bangladesh and suggests further assessment changes. The present official form of undergraduate medical curriculum has first evolved in 1988 followed by revision in 2002 and 2012. Assessment and teaching are the two sides of the same coin. Assessment drives learning and learning drives practices. Following the curriculum reform since 2002, the assessment in undergraduate medical education has been greatly changed. There are a lot of in-course formative assessments which include item examination, card final and term final, designed to improve the quality of education. Ten percent marks of summative written examinations derive from formative assessment. Traditional oral examination has been changed to structured form to ensure greater reliability. Even then, teachers are not yet building up to conduct oral examination in such a structured way. Examiners differ in their personality, style and level of experience with variation of questioning and scoring from student to students. Weakness of reliability on oral examination still exists. Students also feel very stressful during the oral examinations. Moreover, to conduct such oral examination, three to four months times per year are lost by the faculties which can be efficiently utilised for teaching and research purposes. Worlds' leading medical schools now-a-days used oral examination only for borderline and distinction students. Bangladesh also must consider oral examination only for borderline and distinction students.

AB - Background: Medical education in Bangladesh is totally controlled by the Government and run a unique undergraduate curriculum throughout the country in both public and private sectors. This paper is aimed to briefly describe the medical education reform in Bangladesh and suggests further assessment changes. The present official form of undergraduate medical curriculum has first evolved in 1988 followed by revision in 2002 and 2012. Assessment and teaching are the two sides of the same coin. Assessment drives learning and learning drives practices. Following the curriculum reform since 2002, the assessment in undergraduate medical education has been greatly changed. There are a lot of in-course formative assessments which include item examination, card final and term final, designed to improve the quality of education. Ten percent marks of summative written examinations derive from formative assessment. Traditional oral examination has been changed to structured form to ensure greater reliability. Even then, teachers are not yet building up to conduct oral examination in such a structured way. Examiners differ in their personality, style and level of experience with variation of questioning and scoring from student to students. Weakness of reliability on oral examination still exists. Students also feel very stressful during the oral examinations. Moreover, to conduct such oral examination, three to four months times per year are lost by the faculties which can be efficiently utilised for teaching and research purposes. Worlds' leading medical schools now-a-days used oral examination only for borderline and distinction students. Bangladesh also must consider oral examination only for borderline and distinction students.

KW - Assessment

KW - Bangladesh

KW - Medical education

KW - Oral-examination

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886869403&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886869403&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3329/bjms.v12i4.16658

DO - 10.3329/bjms.v12i4.16658

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84886869403

VL - 12

SP - 357

EP - 363

JO - Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science

JF - Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science

SN - 2223-4721

IS - 4

ER -