Aspirin resistance in patients with acute coronary events

Risk factors and prevalence as determined by whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance and associated risk factors based on biochemical parameters using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry. Methods: The study was conducted at the outpatients cardiology clinic of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from August 2011 to February 2012. Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event. Aspirin resistance was measured by a Multiplate® platelet analyser. Results: A total of 74 patients (63 male, 11 female), with a mean age of 57.93 ± 74.1years were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups -first-ever coronary event group (n=52) and recurrent coronary event group (n=22). Aspirin resistance was observed in 12 out of 74 (16%) of the study patients, which consisted of 11 patients from the first-ever coronary event group and one patient from the recurrent coronary event group. There were significant correlations between aspirin resistance and age (r = -0.627; p = 0.029), total cholesterol (r = 0.608; p = 0.036) and LDL (r = 0.694; p = 0.012). LDL was the main predictor for area under the curve (AUC) for aspirin resistance. However, there was no association between aspirin resistance and cardiovascular events in both groups in this study. Conclusions: Aspirin resistance was observed in 16% of the study population. LDL was the major predictor of aspirin resistance. No association was found in the study between aspirin resistance with recurrent coronary events.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPakistan Journal of Medical Sciences
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Aspirin
Electrodes
Malaysia
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Cardiology
Area Under Curve
Blood Platelets
Cholesterol
Population

Keywords

  • Aspirin resistance
  • Aspirin responsiveness
  • First-ever coronary event
  • Multiplate®
  • Platelet analyzer
  • Recurrent coronary event

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Aspirin resistance in patients with acute coronary events: Risk factors and prevalence as determined by whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry",
abstract = "Objectives: To determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance and associated risk factors based on biochemical parameters using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry. Methods: The study was conducted at the outpatients cardiology clinic of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from August 2011 to February 2012. Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event. Aspirin resistance was measured by a Multiplate{\circledR} platelet analyser. Results: A total of 74 patients (63 male, 11 female), with a mean age of 57.93 ± 74.1years were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups -first-ever coronary event group (n=52) and recurrent coronary event group (n=22). Aspirin resistance was observed in 12 out of 74 (16{\%}) of the study patients, which consisted of 11 patients from the first-ever coronary event group and one patient from the recurrent coronary event group. There were significant correlations between aspirin resistance and age (r = -0.627; p = 0.029), total cholesterol (r = 0.608; p = 0.036) and LDL (r = 0.694; p = 0.012). LDL was the main predictor for area under the curve (AUC) for aspirin resistance. However, there was no association between aspirin resistance and cardiovascular events in both groups in this study. Conclusions: Aspirin resistance was observed in 16{\%} of the study population. LDL was the major predictor of aspirin resistance. No association was found in the study between aspirin resistance with recurrent coronary events.",
keywords = "Aspirin resistance, Aspirin responsiveness, First-ever coronary event, Multiplate{\circledR}, Platelet analyzer, Recurrent coronary event",
author = "O. Ibrahim and Oteh Maskon and Noor Darinah and Ali, {Raymond Azman} and Rahman, {Md. Mostafizur}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.12669/pjms.296.3608",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
journal = "Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences",
issn = "1682-024X",
publisher = "Professional Medical Publications",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Aspirin resistance in patients with acute coronary events

T2 - Risk factors and prevalence as determined by whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry

AU - Ibrahim, O.

AU - Maskon, Oteh

AU - Darinah, Noor

AU - Ali, Raymond Azman

AU - Rahman, Md. Mostafizur

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Objectives: To determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance and associated risk factors based on biochemical parameters using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry. Methods: The study was conducted at the outpatients cardiology clinic of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from August 2011 to February 2012. Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event. Aspirin resistance was measured by a Multiplate® platelet analyser. Results: A total of 74 patients (63 male, 11 female), with a mean age of 57.93 ± 74.1years were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups -first-ever coronary event group (n=52) and recurrent coronary event group (n=22). Aspirin resistance was observed in 12 out of 74 (16%) of the study patients, which consisted of 11 patients from the first-ever coronary event group and one patient from the recurrent coronary event group. There were significant correlations between aspirin resistance and age (r = -0.627; p = 0.029), total cholesterol (r = 0.608; p = 0.036) and LDL (r = 0.694; p = 0.012). LDL was the main predictor for area under the curve (AUC) for aspirin resistance. However, there was no association between aspirin resistance and cardiovascular events in both groups in this study. Conclusions: Aspirin resistance was observed in 16% of the study population. LDL was the major predictor of aspirin resistance. No association was found in the study between aspirin resistance with recurrent coronary events.

AB - Objectives: To determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance and associated risk factors based on biochemical parameters using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry. Methods: The study was conducted at the outpatients cardiology clinic of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from August 2011 to February 2012. Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event. Aspirin resistance was measured by a Multiplate® platelet analyser. Results: A total of 74 patients (63 male, 11 female), with a mean age of 57.93 ± 74.1years were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups -first-ever coronary event group (n=52) and recurrent coronary event group (n=22). Aspirin resistance was observed in 12 out of 74 (16%) of the study patients, which consisted of 11 patients from the first-ever coronary event group and one patient from the recurrent coronary event group. There were significant correlations between aspirin resistance and age (r = -0.627; p = 0.029), total cholesterol (r = 0.608; p = 0.036) and LDL (r = 0.694; p = 0.012). LDL was the main predictor for area under the curve (AUC) for aspirin resistance. However, there was no association between aspirin resistance and cardiovascular events in both groups in this study. Conclusions: Aspirin resistance was observed in 16% of the study population. LDL was the major predictor of aspirin resistance. No association was found in the study between aspirin resistance with recurrent coronary events.

KW - Aspirin resistance

KW - Aspirin responsiveness

KW - First-ever coronary event

KW - Multiplate®

KW - Platelet analyzer

KW - Recurrent coronary event

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U2 - 10.12669/pjms.296.3608

DO - 10.12669/pjms.296.3608

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