Are all nasal polyps the same?

Salina Husain, Suria Hayati Mat Pauzi, Aneeza Khairiyah Wan Hamizan, Balwant Singh Gendeh, Valerie J. Lund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine the pattern of cellular infiltration of Nasal Polyps (NP) in different Malaysian ethnic groups who co-exist within the same environment. Methodology: A total of 176 patients with CRS with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) were included in the study. Disease severity was measured by endoscopic examination and computed tomography (CT) using Lund-Mackay scoring system. The number of eosinophils and non-eosinophils were counted, and average number of inflammatory cells for each high power field was calculated. Results: Eosinophil-predominant CRSwNP was seen in 35.8% of patients and 64.2% had non-eosinophil-predominant CRSwNP. Non-eosinophil predominant subtypes could be divided into neutrophil (31.3%), plasma cells and others (33%). Phenotypes of CRSwNP showed a significant association with ethnicity (x2 = 9.640; p < 0.05). 72% of nasal polyps in Chinese showed non-eosinophil predominance, while nasal polyps in Malays and Indians revealed 69% and 41% of the non-eosinophilic phenotype, respectively. However, no association was demonstrated between phenotype of CRSwNP and recurrence rate for NP, endoscopic staging (bilateral) or CT scores (p> 0.05). Conclusion: Our study showed Malaysian Chinese and Malay ethnic groups had a non-eosinophilic phenotype of nasal polyps. This was particularly the case in the Malaysian Chinese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalRawal Medical Journal
Volume42
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Nasal Polyps
Nose
Ethnic Groups
Eosinophils
Phenotype
Plasma Cells
Neutrophils
Cell Count
Tomography
Population

Keywords

  • Chronic rhinosinusitis
  • Eosinophil
  • Nasal polyps
  • Neutrophil
  • Plasma cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Husain, S., Pauzi, S. H. M., Wan Hamizan, A. K., Gendeh, B. S., & Lund, V. J. (2017). Are all nasal polyps the same? Rawal Medical Journal, 42(3), 366-371.

Are all nasal polyps the same? / Husain, Salina; Pauzi, Suria Hayati Mat; Wan Hamizan, Aneeza Khairiyah; Gendeh, Balwant Singh; Lund, Valerie J.

In: Rawal Medical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 3, 2017, p. 366-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Husain, S, Pauzi, SHM, Wan Hamizan, AK, Gendeh, BS & Lund, VJ 2017, 'Are all nasal polyps the same?', Rawal Medical Journal, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 366-371.
Husain S, Pauzi SHM, Wan Hamizan AK, Gendeh BS, Lund VJ. Are all nasal polyps the same? Rawal Medical Journal. 2017;42(3):366-371.
Husain, Salina ; Pauzi, Suria Hayati Mat ; Wan Hamizan, Aneeza Khairiyah ; Gendeh, Balwant Singh ; Lund, Valerie J. / Are all nasal polyps the same?. In: Rawal Medical Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 366-371.
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